All Blog Articles

Living Loud: Heather Whitestone - First Deaf Miss America

Living Loud: Heather Whitestone - First Deaf Miss America

By Marta Belsky  |  Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Heather Whitestone was the First Deaf Miss America. Read the article to learn more about the life and accomplishments of this amazing deaf woman.
Remind students to “Ask the Teacher for Help” with our two minute WonderGrove animated Lesson

Remind students to “Ask the Teacher for Help” with our two minute WonderGrove animated Lesson

By Jillian Winn  |  Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Help students get back into the swing of the school year by showing them our 12 special "Back to School" instructional WonderGrove animations featuring sign language. The "Ask the Teacher for Help" animation is great to encourage students to ask for help when they are confused. Watch the “Ask the Teacher for Help” instructional animation: Accompanying the animation, there are extention lessons for Pre-K, Kindergarten, First Grade, and Second Grade, all which have been crafted by educators and align to the common ...
Interpreter 4-1-1: Prepare Your 10-Second Interpreter Elevator Pitch

Interpreter 4-1-1: Prepare Your 10-Second Interpreter Elevator Pitch

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Interpreters often have just seconds to explain what we do to professional people who don’t really care. Say you just entered the elevator with the doctor of the deaf patient on the way up to the appointment.  What would you say? What’s your “elevator pitch?” Try it out. Time yourself. Can you get it out in 10 seconds?
Start the School Year off Right with

Start the School Year off Right with "Back to School" Animated Lessons!

By Jillian Winn  |  Sunday, August 24, 2014

Getting back into the routine of a new school year can be a challenge, but we’ve created 12 special “Back to School” instructional animations featuring sign language to help students make a smooth transition into the new school year. Crafted by educators, the “Back to School” lessons are designed for Pre-K, Kindergarten, First Grade, and Second Grade and include common core extension lessons, active learning tools, and practice exercises to provide a comprehensive tool to teach 12 vital school behaviors ...
Signing Savvy Announces New Sign Language Advisory Board Members

Signing Savvy Announces New Sign Language Advisory Board Members

By Jillian Winn  |  Tuesday, August 19, 2014

We’re happy to announce the addition of two new members to our Sign Language Advisory Board. The growing Sign Language Advisory Board is made up of thought leaders who have a deep subject manner expertise in sign language and are leaders in their respective fields. Our goal is to have a diverse advisory board with various backgrounds and experience to provide a wide range of advice and expertise. Our new advisory board members include: Donalda Ammons Donalda Ammons, born to all deaf family ...
Interpreter Q & A: Are Piercings Ok for Interpreters?

Interpreter Q & A: Are Piercings Ok for Interpreters?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Wednesday, August 13, 2014

This Interpreter Q & A asks: Last week, while team interpreting in a post-secondary setting, I couldn’t believe my eyes when I noticed a shiny metal ball bouncing around on my partner’s tongue. I found it very distracting and fascinating at the same time. Every time she opened her mouth it was all I could see. I know our Deaf client noticed it too, because when she was called on in class she admitted she was not concentrating, and asked if the professor could please repeat the question. My question is – do I say something to my partner or wait for the Deaf client to say something to her? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives.
Incidental Information You Don't Get when You're Deaf

Incidental Information You Don't Get when You're Deaf

By Marta Belsky  |  Thursday, July 31, 2014

Hearing people have access to “incidental information” all the time. They overhear conversations, they hear comments and remarks on the radio and television. Even background noises count as incidental information. This is called “hearing privilege.”  You don’t even think about it happening because it just does. How often can you actually pinpoint the exact moment you learned a new piece of information? Most of us forget where or how we came by the knowledge we have. We just know what we know. Here are some examples of when hearing people get information that deaf people don’t...
Interpreter 4-1-1: 5 Tips for Job Hunting as an Interpreter

Interpreter 4-1-1: 5 Tips for Job Hunting as an Interpreter

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Today applications for new jobs are increasingly offered exclusively via websites. With social media and our entire lives online most employers know quite a bit about you, including your reputation and writing skills, before they ever meet you face to face.  References have also become more important as references are sometimes the first people that interviewers speak to. Are you representing yourself well? How do you decide who to ask for a reference? Here are 5 tips for laying the foundation for your job hunting and finding a good recommender...
Using a Swiss Cheese Folder to Plug Holes in Education

Using a Swiss Cheese Folder to Plug Holes in Education

By John Miller  |  Monday, July 14, 2014

Being an educator of deaf children for over twenty years, I know the frustrations that occur when you are working with a student and continue to find gaps in their understanding of certain concepts. It’s shocking to find out that your second grader doesn’t know something like their middle name or their address. It’s easy to say to yourself, “Why didn’t the parents or the teachers before me teach this child this information?”   Instead of pointing fingers, there is a ...
Interpreter Q & A: How to Handle Rude Clients

Interpreter Q & A: How to Handle Rude Clients

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Monday, July 7, 2014

This Interpreter Q & A asks: In the post-secondary setting where I interpret, one particular Deaf student frankly doesn’t have much in the way of social skills. She is just plain mean to everyone and it’s uncomfortable and embarrassing to be around her. She’s either rude or inappropriate or both. Her hearing classmates, upon meeting their first real live Deaf person, try to be friendly, but, more often than not, walk away completely turned off. Please don’t tell me to just not take assignments where she is the client; as a staff interpreter, we don’t always have that choice. She knows she’s a "challenge." I suspect she gets off on it! This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives.