An ASL Dictionary

Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

And Much More!

Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

Sign of the Day - SWEET POTATO

All Articles

Addressing Top Signing Misconceptions

Learning Tips   |  Sunday, April 17, 2011

By John Miller

My next few blog posts are going to focus on the "TOP MISCONCEPTIONS" or questions that I seem to get asked about on weekly basis either in person or from users of the site. For those of you that go back and read old blogs these may sound familiar but they still seem to come up, so I thought I would readdress them and maybe word them a little differently to see if we can make them more easily understood.

 

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Browse Signing Savvy on Android!

Site News   |  Tuesday, March 8, 2011

By Jillian Winn

We are happy to report that, in addition to all of your favorite Apple iOS devices, Signing Savvy should now work with your Android devices (Android OS 2.2 or newer with Flash support)!

Just fire up the web browser on your Android device and give it a try. We just got it working so let us know if you are experiencing any troubles.

 

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Enhancements to Word Lists

Site News   |  Monday, March 7, 2011

By Jillian Winn

Creating Word Lists and Sharing Word Lists, when combined with Flash Cards and Quizzing, are our most popular full member features. Today, we added a minor enhancement to creating word lists and a new shared word list of our own.

Creating word lists that are sorted by date

You can now create word lists that sort the word list by the date the words were added to the word list. This is in addition to the previous options of alphabetically or custom ordered word lists. When you view your word lists that are sorted by date, the word list will show the date each word was added to the word list. This may come in handy, for example, if you are teaching (or taking) a sign language class and you want your word list to reflect WHEN the words (signs) were introduced.

What was the Sign of the Day yesterday?

Part of the reason we added the new word list ordering option is so we could add a Sign of the Day word list. This new shared word list shows all of the signs of the day since the Signing Savvy site launched. This is a feature that a number of you have asked for. We are happy to be able to make it available to full members. This is one shared word list that you may want to bookmark.

 

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The mysterious confusion between deafness and blindness

General Interest   |  Wednesday, February 2, 2011

By John Miller

"Oh, so you work with deaf people...so does that mean you know Braille?"

I am sure many of you who have told people you are interested in sign language have heard a question similar to the one above. Although Braille is used by the blind, people often confuse it as a tool for the deaf. As a former teacher of deaf and hard of hearing children, I have witnessed confusion between deafness and blindess several times in my career. I am not sure why people confuse deafness and blindness...and the communication techniques of each, but it happens all the time!

I wonder if it has something to do with the famous story of Helen Keller (see video below).

She was a deafblind woman who used, among other things, sign language to communicate. But it was tactile signing that she used, not American Sign Language.

As a young man I saw the movie, The Miracle Worker (1962), in school. I think everyone in my class learned the sign WATER from watching the story of the young Helen and her teacher, Anne Sullivan, unfold in-front of us.

Because of the combination of deafness and blindness in some individuals, such as Helen Keller, I would like to give you a little background about how people who are deaf AND blind are communicated with.

Anne Sullivan was the first true intervener, although it was not called that in her day. An intervener (or intervenor, in Canada) is defined as a person who provides intervention to an individual who is deaf blind. An intervener mediates between the person who is deafblind and his or her environment to enable him or her to communicate effectively with and receive non-distorted information from the world around them. An intervener acts as the eyes and ears of the person with deafblindness.

The promotional video below from George Brown College, in Toronto, Canada, does a nice job of explaining what an intervener does.

Many people confuse the role of an interpreter and an intervener. An interpreter is a person fluent in sign language that has gone through an interpreter training program and certification process. An interpreters primary role is to mediate communication between the hearing and the deaf.

A person CAN be both an interpreter AND an intervener. In addition to the standard interpreter qualifications, the person would need to have training in the field of intervention with deafblind people.

But, one DOES NOT have to be an interpreter in order to be an intervener. Some people who are considered deafblind may not use sign language but still may need the services of an intervener. Further, some deafblind people may also have additional special needs such as cognitive issues that cause them to not have a large sign language vocabulary so an intervener that works with them may be able to have some knowledge of sign language but not nearly that of a certified interpreter.

For a bit more background on the amazing life of Helen Keller, watch the mini-documentary above.

 

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Happy Holidays!

Site News   |  Thursday, December 23, 2010

By Jillian Winn

The beginning of 2011 will mark the end of our second year of being live on the Internet, and once again, we are very grateful for the support of all of our users. We particularly are thankful for our full members who allow us to continue to grow the site. And grow the site we will! We have several exciting things planned for Signing Savvy in 2011.

From all of us at Signing Savvy, we wish you joy and happiness during this holiday season and all the best in 2011!

 

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