An ASL Dictionary

Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

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Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

Sign of the Day - BEAUTIFUL

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Living Loud: Ella Mae Lentz - Poet, Educator, and Advocate

Living Loud: Ella Mae Lentz - Poet, Educator, and Advocate

Deaf Culture   |  Friday, April 20, 2018

By Marta Belsky

This article is by Marta Belsky. Marta is a third generation ASL user. She has been teaching ASL for 30 years and enjoys sharing her native language with new users.

Ella Mae Lentz is a Deaf American poet, author, educator and advocate. She was born on May 5, 1954 in Berkeley, California to two Deaf parents and has one Deaf brother. In 1971, Lentz graduated from the California School for the Deaf in Berkeley (now known as the California School for the Deaf in Freemont), and went on to Gallaudet University. She graduated from Gallaudet in 1975 with degrees in English and Drama. 

ASL Poet, Performer, and Advocate

Lentz is widely known for her ASL poetry. Many people have studied her poems and have even performed them as reproductions. Some of her original poetry has been published in the video “The Treasure: Poems by Ella Mae Lentz.” A few examples of her poems can be found on YouTube, including The Door (1995), The Rosebush (2008), and To A Hearing Mother (2010).

Lentz was on a talk show titled “Silent Perspectives” in 1974, on television in the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) children’s show “Rainbow’s End” in 1979, a Milwaukee Repertory reproduction of the movie “Children of a Lesser God” in 1980 as character Sarah Norman, and on video with Baker and Cokely’s ASL curriculum commonly referred to as “The Green Books.”

“Instead of looking at what deaf people can’t do, we need to look at ourselves as people who are visual, and who have a community, we need to look at ourselves in a very positive view to confirm who we are as deaf individuals.”
     - Ella Mae Lentz

Lentz has also done hundreds of presentations around the country on ASL, Deaf Culture and Deafhood. At one presentation, Lentz is quoted as saying “Instead of looking at what deaf people can’t do, we need to look at ourselves as people who are visual, and who have a community, we need to look at ourselves in a very positive view to confirm who we are as deaf individuals.” This quote is also representative of her many works of poetry, which focus on bringing Deafhood to the forefront in mainstream American culture as well as Deaf Culture to bolster a sense of community and pride associated with being Deaf. She helped to found the Deafhood Foundation in February 2009 and continues to be on the board of directors. Her goal is to encourage people (hearing and Deaf) to look at Deafhood as an identity based on visual capacity rather than the inability to hear. Lentz also promotes examining traditional definitions of community, ability, relationships and communication that at the same time challenge perspectives of American history related to Deaf people and culture. For example, her interpretation of the National Anthem takes a very direct and personal stance toward American Deaf people that places the focus on Deaf struggles and victories in American history.

Terminology

Deafhood - Deafhood is a Deaf person's unique personal journey to discover and understand themselves as a Deaf person. The term was coined by Dr. Paddy Ladd and was described in an article in Gallaudet Today in 1993. Ladd later wrote a book on the subject in 2003, called Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood.


Educator

Although she is a well-known ASL performer and author, teaching has always been at the core of Lentz’s career and influence. She has over 30 years of experience in academia. She has done research on ASL at many institutions, including: Gallaudet, Northeastern University in Boston, Salk University in San Diego, and the University of California in San Francisco. She also has taught at multiple institutions; Gallaudet University, Ohlone College in Freemont, California and Berkeley City College until her retirement in 2007.

Lentz has developed educational and training material for ASL such as: the National Consortium of Programs for the Training of Sign Language Instructors (NCPTSLI) and the Signing Naturally curriculum series. The NCPTSLI came as a result of a Federal grant program with the National Association of the Deaf with the goal of upgrading ASL instruction, and for two years, Lentz developed and tested curricula and recruited and trained instructors. The Signing Naturally curriculum series started with a three year grant through Funds for Improvement of Post Secondary Education to develop curriculum for teaching ASL as a second language. Her work on the Signing Naturally curriculum continues today.

Advocacy Continues

After retiring from teaching, Lentz formed the company ASL Presents in 2007, which offers services in coaching, consulting, presentations, performances, and ASL and Deaf Culture curriculum. She continues to be an advocate for ASL, Deaf Culture, and Deafhood.

Lentz is married to her longtime partner, Judy D. Gough. The couple has raised five children, of whom the youngest is Deaf. They also have ten grandchildren, of which three are Deaf. They love animals and have had dogs, cats, llamas, a goat, rabbits, rats, a mouse, and iguanas.

For more information on what Lentz is currently working on, visit the ASL Presents website.

Resources

 

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About the Author

Marta Belsky Marta Belsky is a third generation ASL user. She has been teaching ASL for 30 years and enjoys sharing her native language with new users. Marta is on the Lansing Community College Interpreter Training Program Advisory Board and has also been a board member for the Michigan Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf and the Michigan Chapter of American Sign Language Teachers Association.

More about Marta  |  Articles by Marta

Interpreter Q & A: Why do ITP students date Deaf people while they are in the program?

Interpreter Tips   |  Sunday, December 3, 2017

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Fall 2017 Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID. VIEWS is a digital publication distributed quarterly by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and dedicated to the interpreting profession. The magazine includes RID member spotlights, announcements from the RID board, and engaging stories about issues impacting the interpreting community. See this article and more in the Fall 2017 Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID.

Dear BC,

A recent phenomenon I have noticed is a growing tendency for ITP students to date Deaf people while they are in the program. What is behind this?

Sincerely,
Curious Spectator

The video features a full interpretation of what is discussed in this article.

An ITP Student's Perspective:

I would say that when ITP students first get acquainted with the Deaf community, it feels like Deaf people are the coolest thing since sliced bread. In an ITP, you’re learning all these things about Deaf culture and the language. Then you meet some really awesome people from the community and it’s hard not to be star-struck. If you find out a Deaf person is interested in you, it is easy to get swept up in it all. I have even heard some students who are NERDAs (Not Even Related to a Deaf Adult) say that they are jealous of CODAs. I think what they mean is they wish they had that strong connection to the Deaf community. I can see why the Deaf community might question our motives, but as a group of young people, we are all just eager to network and navigate these new and exciting relationships.

An Experienced Interpreter's Perspective:

This may be a natural consequence of getting involved in the community, but students need to make sure their choices will benefit them and their career in the long run. Involving themselves in the community in any way that is unethical will ultimately destroy the relationship. Taking advantage or trying to get ahead with those who an interpreter relies on for their livelihood will seriously jeopardize their ability to continue in the profession.

An Experienced Deaf Consumer's Perspective:

When two people from different cultures begin dating it is easy to overlook some of the power-sharing or cultural exchanges that occur. It is important to recognize that between two cultural groups, things are equally exchanged: ASL is exchanged for English, hearing culture is exchanged for Deaf culture, and so on. If the parties are trying to exchange different things, the dynamic may shift from healthy to oppressive. ASL is a wonderful, vibrant language and the Deaf community embodies an extremely diverse and rich culture. Those in cross-cultural relationships should take care that the languages and people involved are valued and treated with respect.

What's your perspective? Share your thoughts in the comments below.
 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about BC  |  Articles by BC

5 Cool New Features in the Updated Signing Savvy Member App

5 Cool New Features in the Updated Signing Savvy Member App

Site News   |  Saturday, November 18, 2017

By Jillian Winn

We did a complete rewrite to our Signing Savvy Member App this Fall for both Apple iOS and Android mobile devices. Since then, we have continued to release updates to the app to add more features and make tweaks based on feedback from our savvy members. The current version of the app, as of the date of this article, is version 2.4. The new app is 64-bit compatible (required for iOS 11), now supports the iPhone X display, and includes several new features. Whether you have used the mobile app for years or haven’t tried it out yet, we wanted to make sure you knew about some of the cool new things you can do with the new and improved Signing Savvy Member App.

1. Higher quality video and support for both portrait and landscape display.

All of our videos have been updated for the new app, so the videos are higher quality with crisper images. In the past, the app only worked with portrait display, but with the new app, you can turn your mobile device horizontally and the app will switch to landscape mode, which allows you to view sign videos even larger. This is a great new feature for those that want a closer view of what is being signed.

Example of Landscape View in App
Simply rotate your device to view the app in landscape mode.

2. New Improved Sign of the Day!

Do you love to see our sign of the day everyday? Our sign of the day has evolved in the past few years. Originally, we picked a random sign for the day. Now each sign of the day is thoughtfully selected to be related to something happening on that day, such as a holiday, or a deaf culture tidbit.

If you check the sign of the day on the Signing Savvy website, there is an additional description that gives some context to the sign of the day. For example (warning upcoming SOTD spoilers!)… the sign on November 21st, 2017 will be GAME because it will be “National Game & Puzzle Week”… the sign on November 29th, 2017 will be ROLE because “Linda Bove was born in November. She is a deaf actress and played the ROLE of Linda the librarian on Sesame Street for 31 years.”

Although we have had these added descriptions that explain why the sign of the day was selected on our website for some time, they were not in the app, but now they are!

Sign Notice for Sign of the Day
The sign notice explains why the sign is the Sign of the Day.

3. Signed Sentences of the Day!

If you don’t already follow us on our Signing Savvy Twitter Feed or "like" our Signing Savvy Facebook Page, you might not have noticed we have signed sentences of the day that go with our sign of the day on the Signing Savvy website. The signed sentences help people see more signed examples and see signs used in context. Now signed sentences of the day are also available in the Signing Savvy Member App!

The sentences can be found in the app by clicking on the “Examples” tab under the sign video. Here is an example of a signed sentence. 

Sentence of the Day in the app
See signed example sentences by clicking on the Examples tab.

4. Images

For the last few years, we have been adding images to signs on the Signing Savvy website, but these images were not shown in the old Signing Savvy Member App. The updated mobile app now includes these images - just click on the image tab to see related images that help you understand the meaning of the sign, particularly for young learners. Images have also been integrated into the word lists and digital flash cards in the app.

Example Images in App
Click on the Images tab to see example images of the sign meaning.

5. Audio to go with signs.

You have probably noticed that our signed videos do not include audio. Signing does include inflections and mouth morphemes, but it’s not natural to be speaking as you are signing. However, we’ve gotten feedback specifically from some teachers that being able to see the sign video, the written word, an image of the word, and have the ability to hear the word would be helpful for hearing students. We have now added this optional feature into the member app.

Example Audio in App
Click on the Sound Icon in the app to hear audio of what is being signed.

And there is more...

We have also added many improvements to the user interface, word lists and digital flash cards in the app, but we’re already covered FIVE cool new features in the updated Signing Savvy Member App, so stay tuned for a future article that goes into more detail on the new features of word lists and digital flash cards in the app.

If you are a Signing Savvy member and have an Apple iOS or Android mobile device, make sure to download the latest version of the Signing Savvy Member App today! If you are not yet a member, the Signing Savvy Member App is an excellent reason to become a member so you can access the Signing Savvy learning resources in a streamlined fashion when you are on-the-go.

 

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Teaching Language Through Play: Lessons Learned While Playing Restaurant and Getting Started with Introducing Food

Teaching Language Through Play: Lessons Learned While Playing Restaurant and Getting Started with Introducing Food

Teaching Tips   |  Wednesday, November 1, 2017

By John Miller

Kids naturally learn while they are playing. Introducing activities that allow them to learn through play lets them explore their curiosity, have new experiences, and better connect and retain what they have learned.

Lessons Learned While Playing "Restaurant"

One great example of a learning through play activity is setting up an area to play “restaurant” in the classroom (or at home). Playing restaurant is a very successful way to cover several areas all at the same time – vocabulary, health and nutrition, math, time, professions, and manners.

Think about a restaurant experience, including:

  • Choosing a restaurant
  • Getting to the restaurant
  • Parking the car
  • Talking to a hostess
  • Being seated or seating yourself
  • Looking through the menu and deciding what to eat
  • Ordering
  • Setting the table
  • Where the food comes from and cooking the meal
  • The people working in the restaurant and what they do
  • Serving the meal
  • Table manners and eating
  • How much things cost and paying
  • Taking payment and giving change
  • Feeling thankful and showing appreciation

Many lessons can all be taught through fun and interesting role play that involve tons and tons of lessons and vocabulary. These are all concepts that not only provide education related to curriculum goals, but allow the child to experiment in a safe environment and experience through play, which can help them be better prepared for real world situations.

One example of this is confidence building when ordering at a restaurant. It is not unusual to see young deaf teens that don’t feel comfortable enough in a restaurant environment to make their own order. Often their parents jump in and “rescue” them because they naturally want to protect their child from an uncomfortable situation. That is part of what this activity and lesson is all about. The more you educate and familiarize your students with these situations, the more prepared they will be to handle real world situations.

Through a series of blog articles, I will provide example lessons and activities related to playing restaurant. To get started, this article will discuss the first step of introducing food.

Lesson: Introducing Food

Take the time to introduce food through a formal lesson. I like to introduce real food and pretend food together. Allow the students to touch and taste the real food before they interact with the play food. Show them how to prepare it (do you have to peel it? remove seeds? cook it first?), ways to eat it, and examples of how to use it in dishes. You can share nutritional information and health benefits about the food. Anything you can do to expand their experience with the food will help them to remember both the signs and also any facts you teach about the food. 

This is a fun activity that students will be excited to share with their parents. Letting parents know the signs used in this lesson will encourage them to keep the discussion through signing going on at home. If you are a member on Signing Savvy, you can create your own word list for this lesson or you can use one of our pre-built word lists (this can help outline your lesson plan also!). Then send the link to the word list(s) home to parents so that they can easily access them and learn them for themselves, or support the learning that happens at school (they don’t have to be a Signing Savvy member to view the signs in your word lists). Additionally, Signing Savvy members can use word lists to practice vocabulary through quizzes and digital flash cards.

Below are some posters and word lists to get you started.

Vegetables in ASL

Vegetables in American Sign Language (ASL)

Signing Savvy Member Feature: Download this image / flyer as a printable PDF page.
Corresponding Wordlist: Vegetables in ASL poster wordlist

Fruit in ASL

Fruit in American Sign Language (ASL)

Signing Savvy Member Feature: Download this image / flyer as a printable PDF page.
Corresponding Wordlist: Fruit in ASL poster wordlist

Supplies Needed

Unfortunately, we can’t always have access to a variety of real food to taste test in the classroom! To get students engaged in this activity and to prepare for future restaurant play-based lessons, it is important to establish a good supply of pretend foods that would cover not only the food groups, but also be able to make up meals that would cover breakfast, lunch and dinner. It is good to have a variety of pretend foods, even if there is some overlap, to be able to show your students that the food they consume can come in different colors and sizes (a cut up carrot as opposed to a whole carrot or even a shredded carrot; OR the fact that a whole peach looks much different than a sliced, peeled, or canned peach).

Below is a list of many great options you can purchase directly off Amazon to get you started.  Some of them even come with different lesson suggestions and activities you can do with your children as well. We’ve also created pre-built wordlists of signs to accompany each set of play food.

Peel N' Play Veggies Playset (By Small World Toys)

View word list of ASL signs for Play Veggies Playset

Farmers Market Color Sorting Set (By Learning Resources)

View word list of ASL signs for farmers market color sorting set

Cutting Food & Fruit Sets (By Melissa and Doug)

View word list of ASL signs for cutting food and fruit sets

Tote with Fruit & Veggies (By New Sprouts)

View word list of ASL signs for tote with fruit and vegetables

Healthy Dinner Set (By New Sprouts)

View word list of ASL signs for healthy dinner set

Grocery Basket with Fruit & Veggies (By Casdon)

View word list of ASL signs for grocery basket fruit and vegetables

Large Variety Pack of Food (By Liberty Imports)

View word list of ASL signs for large variety pack of food

Fast Food & Dessert Play Food (By Liberty Imports)

View word list of ASL signs for fast food and dessert play food

Burger, Hot Dog, Chips, & Onion Rings Food Set (By Liberty Imports)

View word list of ASL signs for fast burger, hot dog, chips, and onion rings food

Introduce your children to food and establish a good supply of pretend food, then watch for future blogs discussing other play-based lessons for your classroom restaurant.

 

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Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 6

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 6

Learning Tips   |  Monday, September 25, 2017

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings.

Hello! Brenda Cartwright (BC) here. Let's continue on the fun topic of: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

The ASL signs shown below look similar, but are not the same. There are many ASL signs that when produced look similar, but in fact have a completely different meaning. Below you will find examples of such signs. Watch closely to see if you can see the difference. In addition, watch my eyebrows, look to see when I tilt my head or lean my body in a certain way, even what my mouth is doing. These nuances are called inflections and trust me, inflections matter. Enjoy!

1. Vacation vs. Day Off

VACATION and DAY OFF use the same handshape, palm orientation, location, and movement - both open 5-hands, with palms down, come in and tap near your armpits. The difference between these two signs is that VACATION taps twice and DAY OFF taps once. How can you remember the difference between the two? Think of DAY OFF tapping only once because it is a single day, while a VACATION is for multiple days (hopefully!).

Vacation
Day Off

2. Concern vs. Excite

Two 25-hands are used for both CONCERN and EXCITE, but the movement is different. When signing CONCERN, the hands move towards and away from the body with the middle fingers of each hand alternately touching the chest. Think of this movement as having CONCERN between different things and weighing the options. EXCITE has your middle fingers alternately touching your chest as you move your hands in an upward, circular motion. Think of your heart beating rapidly with anticipation while signing EXCITE.

Concern
Excite

3. Prefer vs. Taste

With both PREFER and TASTE, the 25-hand moves towards the face and your middle finger taps twice, but the location the finger touches is different. PREFER touches the chin, while TASTE touches the lips. You can remember to touch the lips when signing TASTE because food tastes good in your mouth and PREFER is signed close to, but lower than, where TASTE is signed because when you prefer something, you have a taste for it.

Prefer
Taste

4. Lonely vs. Real

The 1-hand is used near the mouth when signing both LONELY and REAL. When signing LONELY, the 1-hand makes a circular motion back toward the face. To remember the sign for LONELY, think of having no one to kiss. To sign REAL, the 1-hand makes a swift motion up and out from the mouth and the straightforward motion suggests truth or keeping it real.

Lonely
Real

5. Odd vs. Look For

ODD and LOOK FOR both use the dominant C-hand starting on the dominate side of your face. When signing ODD, the hand arches across the face and down, while a circular motion is made twice when signing LOOK FOR. You can remember the difference between these two signs by thinking of the circular motion made while signing LOOK FOR as the motion made when using a looking glass and searching for something. The C-hand arches or flips down when signing ODD indicating something is different or odd.

Odd
Look-For

These examples are aligned with the Visual Discrimination section of Lesson 9 (page 109) from Lessons and Activities in American Sign Language by Brenda E. Cartwright and Suellen J. Bahleda. Check out the book for more ASL Activities and watch for more examples from this series: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about BC  |  Articles by BC

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