All Blog Articles

Deaf American Jazz Singer and Songwriter Chooses to “Try” After Hearing Loss

Deaf American Jazz Singer and Songwriter Chooses to “Try” After Hearing Loss

By Jillian Winn  |  Saturday, June 10, 2017

Mandy Harvey starting singing when she was four. She sang in choral groups and music competitions in high school and she was recognized as the "Top Female Vocalist" at Longmont High School when she graduated in 2006. Mandy was then one of only fifteen students accepted as a vocal major into Colorado State University. However, Mandy suffered from reoccurring hearing problems and during her freshman year in college she lost hearing (110 decibels) in both ears.
5 Tips for Overwhelmed Parents of Deaf Children

5 Tips for Overwhelmed Parents of Deaf Children

By John Miller  |  Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Overwhelmed… The look on the faces, or the words that came out of the mouths of almost every parent of a deaf child I’ve ever met with during a home visit. The first thing I want to say is, “Move over because you aren’t alone on that bench,” and secondly, “Stop feeling guilty about anything and everything and lets make a commitment and move forward now, looking in the rearview mirror is only good to learn from, NOT to see ...
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 5

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 5

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Friday, March 24, 2017

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) SATISFY vs. RELIEF, (2) COMPLICATED vs. VERY UGLY, (3) SEMESTER vs. SYSTEM, (4) GAME vs. CHALLENGE, and (5) ELECTRICITY vs. PHYSICS.
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 4

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 4

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Tuesday, January 17, 2017

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) OPEN vs. CLOSE, (2) LOVE vs. HUG, (3) ICE SKATE vs. ROLLER SKATE, (4) BLACK vs. SUMMER, and (5) CAN vs. POSSIBLE.
Interpreter 4-1-1: The Importance of Interpreters Knowing Their Own Comfort Zone

Interpreter 4-1-1: The Importance of Interpreters Knowing Their Own Comfort Zone

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Sunday, January 1, 2017

Every human being has biases and the ability to predict events is one of the most valuable you can cultivate as an interpreter. As interpreters we have unique access to the lives of our clients. We need to know ourselves and our hidden biases.  What content or situations would you not feel comfortable interpreting?  What interpreting situations are deal breakers? What steps could you take when you find yourself in these situations?
Exploring Holiday Family Traditions at School and ADDING LANGUAGE

Exploring Holiday Family Traditions at School and ADDING LANGUAGE

By John Miller  |  Wednesday, November 30, 2016

We are constantly posting tips, facts, and learning resources related to sign language and Deaf culture on our Signing Savvy Facebook Page and Twitter @SigningSavvy. Occasionally we get questions about our posts and explain them further with a followup article. This article expands on one of our Parent/Teacher Quick Tip of the Day posts (Tip #60) from Facebook, which is also often tied to our Sign of the Day.  Typically, Deaf Education Classrooms consist of a low number of students per class.  This allows teachers ...
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 3

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 3

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Wednesday, November 16, 2016

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) NUT vs. NOT, (2) PAPER vs. SCHOOL, (3) NAME vs. WEIGH, (4) TEACH vs. NONE, and (5) ROOF vs. HOUSE.
The Importance of Early Exposure to American Sign Language with Deaf Children

The Importance of Early Exposure to American Sign Language with Deaf Children

By Jillian Winn  |  Thursday, November 3, 2016

Around 8,000 children are born deaf or hard of hearing each year in the United States. 95% of those children are born into hearing families. This means a few things – the majority of hard of hearing children are born into families that do not use sign language and their parents do not have previous experience with raising and educating a deaf child. The options and information may be overwhelming for parents, but just like raising any child, each child and family is different and there isn’t a “one size fits all” plan to execute. Luckily there is research to help serve as a guide.
Living Loud: Lou Ferrigno – The Incredible Hulk of acting, bodybuilding, fitness training, and motivational speaking

Living Loud: Lou Ferrigno – The Incredible Hulk of acting, bodybuilding, fitness training, and motivational speaking

By Marta Belsky  |  Monday, October 24, 2016

Lou Ferrigno was The Incredible Hulk of acting, bodybuilding, fitness training, and motivational speaking. Read the article to learn more about the life and accomplishments of this amazing deaf man.
Interpreter Q & A: Wearing a Brace While Interpreting

Interpreter Q & A: Wearing a Brace While Interpreting

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Thursday, October 13, 2016

This Interpreter Q & A asks: I am currently wearing a brace on my wrist for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Today during a break the Deaf client came up to me and asked me to remove my brace because she found it distracting and it affected my clarity. She also said it made her feel guilty for having to make me work. What do you think I should have done? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives.