An ASL Dictionary

Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

And Much More!

Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

Sign of the Day - MISS
(as in to miss something)

Blog Articles by: John Miller

Tips for Reading Fingerspelling

Learning Tips   |  Saturday, March 13, 2010

By John Miller

Many people talk to me about their frustrations with fingerspelling and want suggestions on how to improve their receptive skills when it comes to reading fingerspelling.

My suggestions tend to follow a lot of the same rules that apply to teaching a child to read:

  1. Practice, practice, pratice...the more you work on reading other people's fingerspelling, the better you will get. Everyone's fingers are different so it is important to practice with many different partners in order to experience all the styles of hands. (Unfortunately not everyone has long easily read fingers!)
  2. Don't get stuck on reading each letter as an individual letter. Instead think of it and the "shape" of the word. Watch for double letters and the beginning and ending letters. You should be able to fill in the rest with the contextual clues (much like you do with reading an unknown word in a sentence in a written passage).
  3. Instead of saying each letter as you are seeing it, say each SOUND. (You are basically sounding it out.) This will help as you are trying to figure out the word. That way when you miss a letter here and there, by sounding it out you will be able to fill in the blanks.

Fingerspelling, hands-down is one of the trickiest parts of the language. Don't get too frustrated. Take it slow at first. Don't be afraid to ask a deaf person to "spell it again please", they more than likely will be happy to repeat themselves.

Happy Signing!

 

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Children love to cook!

Teaching Tips   |  Sunday, March 7, 2010

By John Miller

They just do! I often used cooking as a teaching tool the classroom.

Once my students got the skills in place through our dramatic play (described earlier), we would do cooking activities in the classroom and invite others in to join us and taste our creations.

While cooking, we would again use our digital camera to document the steps in the process. We would print off these photos later and have the students put them in order (sequencing) and add captions to the photos (writing skills). We would then place these on colorful construction paper, laminated and bound together (again the spiral binders) to make a book that the students could revisit later. The final pages of the book would have the signs for the ingredients used as well as the result food made from the ingredients.

The books were sent home for parents to read, then placed back in the classroom library. The interesting thing is that the students would often choose these books as their books to read during quiet reading. They loved to see themselves in the books.

Signing Savvy would make this activities easier with the ability to create word lists and print signs.

 

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Using Figurative Language with Sign

Learning Tips   |  Thursday, February 25, 2010

By John Miller

Many people have asked how to sign things that say one thing but mean something else. This happens a lot in the English Language!

Some Examples: It's raining cats and dogs!, or You look really sharp today.

Now as native users of the English language, we know that neither cats or dogs are falling from the skies .nor is the person in the second sentence looking rather pointed. These are concepts that people who are learning English as a second language also struggle with, yet we find phrases like these used in everyday language all the time. The thing for you to focus on as a signer is the main idea of what is being said and then sign it conceptually correct.

It's raining cats and dogs = It's really raining hard

Even with this example you would NOT sign that it is raining HARD (as in the opposite of soft). You would sign RAIN + A LOT or RAIN+RAIN+RAIN (with a facial expression showing a lot).

You look really sharp today = You look really nice today.

You would sign it like this.

Now, with that said, as a former teacher, I would think that it is important for my students to know what someone was saying when they used figurative language (whether it was being said live or they are reading it in a book, and it is actually fun to see my students use it in their everyday use of language). So I would sign it conceptually correct first but then TEACH them the way it is used in figurative language and sign it back and forth interchangeably so that it becomes part of the student's vocabulary.

 

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What Happened in School Today?

Teaching Tips   |  Sunday, January 24, 2010

By John Miller

How frustrating it must be as a parent to have your deaf child come home and have no idea what has just happened to them for the last seven hours. The child may do their best to communicate their day but many of them have JUST learned the vocabulary themselves and reproducing them once they get home for mom and dad is difficult to say the least.

One idea that I used that was very successful was a daily journal that consisted of digital pictures of activities that happened throughout the day. I would keep a large piece of white construction paper up on the easel near our calendar area. We would begin writing on it during our daily calendar time. As we went through calendar, we would write the date and the weather on the top of that paper. Then as different activities happened throughout our day, a picture would be printed off and would appear on the paper. The students would then have to assists in adding a caption to the picture describing IN WORDS what the class was doing in the pictures.

Besides being a nice way of teaching the concept of summarizing, we had a communication tool that went between home and school. At the end of the day, that large piece of paper was set on the copy machine and reduced in size to about 60 percent. This made the page large enough to still read, yet much small enough to carry home. The students had assisted in the creation of the captions, and now they had a visual aid to help with their retelling of their day.

A Signing Savvy addition would be to print 3-5 signs from the day and include them with the paper. This way both the students and their parents would have instant access to these signs and will be able to use them in the discussion of the day's events.

 

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Dramatic Play

Teaching Tips   |  Sunday, January 17, 2010

By John Miller

Dramatic play is such an underrated way for children to learn. I had so much fun interacting with my preschool deaf children and watching how they would communicate through dramatic play. It opened the doors for so many teaching/learning opportunities.

One of my favorites was making restaurant menus including all the plastic play food we had in our dramatic play kitchens and creating our own cafe. The pages would include a digital photo of the food along with a printed version of the sign and then the price. These were all laminated and bound together with a spiral binder. With this we would play restaurant for hours working on such skills as following directions, using our manners to ask questions and treat people politely, table manners, proper nutrition, even math skills as we added up the bills and made change using a calculator. I seriously had some of my 1st graders making change and even leaving a tip! They never saw this as teaching...they were playing...AND LEARNING!

 

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