Blog Articles by BRENDA CARTWRIGHT

Interpreter Q & A: Is it ok to eat at a work event once my assignment ends?

Interpreter Q & A: Is it ok to eat at a work event once my assignment ends?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Friday, November 16, 2018

This Interpreter Q & A asks: I was asked to interpret for an art department showcase. Food was served during the presentations. After it was over there was an announcement that there was tons of food left and for everyone to "eat up!" My client encouraged me to get some food. My interpreting duties were finished, but I still felt strange about it. I wasn’t sure if it was appropriate? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Summer 2018 (Issue 35 Volume 3) Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID.
Interpreter 4-1-1: Self-Care is the New Normal

Interpreter 4-1-1: Self-Care is the New Normal

By Lindsey Williams and Brenda Cartwright  |  Monday, October 15, 2018

"Self-care" is a popular topic in recent years, and the trend isn’t slowing down. One problem noticed by your authors, however, is that there seem to be competing definitions of this idea and it’s causing a breakdown in the discussion about the importance of self-care. Should self-care be understood as indulgence? Eating a piece of chocolate cake because it’s been a rough day and this will help you to feel better? Or should self-care be thought of as goal-setting?
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 7

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 7

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2018

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) BRAIN vs. THINK, (2) COLOR vs. FRIENDLY, (3) OH I SEE vs. YELLOW, (4) HISTORY vs. HARD OF HEARING, and (5) FANCY vs. FINE.
Interpreter Q & A: Should interpreters share stories about their day (and their clients)?

Interpreter Q & A: Should interpreters share stories about their day (and their clients)?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Friday, June 8, 2018

This Interpreter Q & A asks: My neighbor is an interpreter and she was telling me about all the gory things she has to face on a daily basis as an interpreter: feces, fungus, blood, naked bodies, nasty smells, foul language etc... No names of clients were disclosed but I couldn’t help but wonder how Deaf people would feel if they knew that she was talking and laughing about them. I remember when I was in the hospital, I was so sick I puked. I’m sure my poop stunk. I’m sure I looked like crap. I hope my nurses didn’t talk about me. I think the same should apply to interpreters. What is your opinion about this? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Spring 2018 (Issue 35 Volume 2) Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID.
Interpreter Q & A: What to do when your team interpreter has an unexcused (and provocative) absence?

Interpreter Q & A: What to do when your team interpreter has an unexcused (and provocative) absence?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Monday, April 23, 2018

This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Winter 2018 Edition of VIEWS Magazine (page 28-29) from RID. VIEWS is a digital publication distributed quarterly by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and dedicated to the interpreting profession. The magazine includes RID member spotlights, announcements from the RID board, and engaging stories about issues impacting the ...
Interpreter Q & A: Why do ITP students date Deaf people while they are in the program?

Interpreter Q & A: Why do ITP students date Deaf people while they are in the program?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Sunday, December 3, 2017

This Interpreter Q & A asks: A recent phenomenon I have noticed is a growing tendency for ITP students to date Deaf people while they are in the program. What is behind this? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Fall 2017 Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID.
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 6

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 6

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Monday, September 25, 2017

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) VACATION vs. DAY OFF, (2) CONCERN vs. EXCITE, (3) PREFER vs. TASTE, (4) LONELY vs. REAL, and (5) ODD vs. LOOK FOR.
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 5

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 5

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Friday, March 24, 2017

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) SATISFY vs. RELIEF, (2) COMPLICATED vs. VERY UGLY, (3) SEMESTER vs. SYSTEM, (4) GAME vs. CHALLENGE, and (5) ELECTRICITY vs. PHYSICS.
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 4

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 4

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Tuesday, January 17, 2017

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) OPEN vs. CLOSE, (2) LOVE vs. HUG, (3) ICE SKATE vs. ROLLER SKATE, (4) BLACK vs. SUMMER, and (5) CAN vs. POSSIBLE.
Interpreter 4-1-1: The Importance of Interpreters Knowing Their Own Comfort Zone

Interpreter 4-1-1: The Importance of Interpreters Knowing Their Own Comfort Zone

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Sunday, January 1, 2017

Every human being has biases and the ability to predict events is one of the most valuable you can cultivate as an interpreter. As interpreters we have unique access to the lives of our clients. We need to know ourselves and our hidden biases.  What content or situations would you not feel comfortable interpreting?  What interpreting situations are deal breakers? What steps could you take when you find yourself in these situations?