An ASL Dictionary

Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

And Much More!

Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

Sign of the Day - BLACK FRIDAY

All Articles

Black Friday to Cyber Monday Sale!

Site News   |  Thursday, November 27, 2014

By Jillian Winn


  

Black Friday to Cyber Monday sale

SAVE 25% ON 1-YEAR and 3-YEAR INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIPS


Use promo code: THANKYOU2014


This Thanksgiving, we are thankful for your support!

Thank you for being part of the Signing Savvy community of users. Thank you for using Signing Savvy, giving us your praise, and recommending Signing Savvy to others.

We especially want to thank those with full membership. In addition to accessing the full member features (such as unlimited searching, the ability to create word lists, practice through digital flash cards and quizzes, use of the mobile Apps, etc.), membership helps us continue to add more sign videos, content, and features to the site.

We offer free access to all of our signs. 

We are passionate about sign language education and increasing communication through the use of sign language. Any one can visit the Signing Savvy website or create a Registered Guest account for free. We offer free access to all of our signs through browsing and limited searches because we want everyone to have access to learn sign language.

But, membership provides much more...

Signing Savvy membership provides unrestricted, full access to all Signing Savvy features. There are many benefits to full membership, including unlimited searching, larger videos, the ability to create wordlists, use digital flashcards and quizzing, access to use our mobile app, and more. Learn about all of the features.

Why is there a cost for membership?

We hope that those that love to use Signing Savvy and want to take advantage of the member features would become full members in order to help support us. We would not be able to offer these features and maintain them (or even have the Signing Savvy website) without charging for membership.  There is a cost to creating, maintaining, and growing the website - equipment, software, hardware, hosting, and staff costs. We're always working to improve Signing Savvy, add to our content, and enhance our features - our work is never done!

Love Signing Savvy?

Please consider becoming a member today or purchasing a gift of membership for friends and family this holiday season to support our continued effort to improve Signing Savvy and make it the best sign language resource.

If you can’t afford membership at this time, please continue to use the free features of Signing Savvy, consider becoming a member in the future, putting membership on your holiday wish list, and help spread the word by recommending Signing Savvy to others.

We have a recommendation program and easy graphic links you can use to link to us.  You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Pinterest.


Sale valid Thursday, November 27, 2014 12:01 AM through Monday, December 1, 2014 11:59 PM. Use promo code: THANKYOU2014 for individual or gift memberships for 1-year and 3-year terms (if you currently have a membership, the new membership time will be added to your account in addition to any membership time you already have).

 

View/Add Comments (0 comments)

Happy Thanksgiving!

General Interest   |  Wednesday, November 26, 2014

By Jillian Winn

We hope that you have a very happy Thanksgiving! 

Did you notice the theme of our Signs of the Day for the past week?  Leading up to Thanksgiving, all of our Signs of the Day have been Thanksgiving related: 

We also have a Thanksgiving Coloring Page from our partners at WonderGrove Learn Animated Lessons with Sign Language that you can print out and color.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving Coloring Page

 

View/Add Comments (0 comments)

Certified Deaf Interpreters Explained

Interpreter Tips   |  Friday, November 14, 2014

By Marta Belsky

This article is by Marta Belsky. Marta is a third generation ASL user. She has been teaching ASL for 20 years and enjoys sharing her native language with new users.

While the concept of Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDI) is not new, many people are not familiar with what they do, so misunderstandings can occur on how to utilize deaf interpreters.

What is a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI)?

CDI’s are deaf or hard of hearing individuals who are nationally certified by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID). They serve as an equal member of the interpreting team along with a certified hearing interpreter. The CDI interprets the message from the deaf consumer to the hearing interpreter and the hearing interpreter then relays the message to the hearing consumer.

Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) explained

When to use a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI)?

A CDI is always a great addition to the interpreting team. Certified Deaf Interpreters have extensive knowledge and experience with deafness, the deaf community, and Deaf culture, in addition to having sign language as their native language – all of which can enhance the interpreting experience.

While a certified hearing interpreter may be adequate in many situations, CDIs are particularly useful when the communication mode used by the deaf consumer is unique, such as when they have minimal or limited communication skills or use signs that a hearing interpreter may not be familiar with (non-standard signs, "home" signs, a foreign sign language, regional signs, etc.).

It is important to remember that except for Children Of Deaf Adults (CODAs), American Sign Language is not the first language of hearing interpreters. CDI’s provide interpretation to the deaf consumer in their native language without the addition of an English accent and may also have a better understanding of what the deaf consumer is communicating.

Why to use a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI)?

Some hearing interpreters may be hesitant to work with a CDI. They think, "I can interpret very well so there is no need for a deaf interpreter." Others feel "demoted" or "insulted" to have a Certified Deaf Interpreter working with them because they feel it indicates their own interpreting skills are lacking. Some may even feel intimidated to have a certified deaf interpreter "watching" them.

While all these feelings are understandable, hearing interpreters would not have those feelings if they had proper training and knowledge of how to utilize a Certified Deaf Interpreter.

Reasons to support the use of a deaf/hearing interpreting team include:

  1. Often when a deaf consumer meets a hearing interpreter they tend to worry about their English. With a CDI present they are more relaxed and express themselves more freely.
  2. When the hearing interpreter hears a question and signs it to the CDI they have the opportunity to double check if the message is the same when the deaf interpreter signs the question to the deaf consumer.
  3. The hearing interpreter can watch the deaf consumer’s answer and then watch the deaf interpreter sign it to double-check before voicing the answer.
  4. The deaf consumer has the advantage of being able to double-check as the deaf interpreter relays their message to the hearing interpreter.
  5. If there is confusion, the CDI and hearing interpreter can work together to better understand the message and provide the best interpretation.

More deaf interpreters are now obtaining CDI certification. Including a CDI as part of the interpreting team enhances the experience for the consumers (deaf and hearing), improves the service the hearing interpreter is able to provide, and makes communicating the message more successful.

Resources:

 

View/Add Comments (0 comments)

About the Author

Marta Belsky Marta Belsky is a third generation ASL user. She has been teaching ASL for 20 years and enjoys sharing her native language with new users. Marta is on the Lansing Community College Interpreter Training Program Advisory Board and has also been a board member for the Michigan Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf and the Michigan Chapter of American Sign Language Teachers Association.

More about Marta  |  Articles by Marta

5 Tips for Being Successful in an Interpreter Training Program

5 Tips for Being Successful in an Interpreter Training Program

Interpreter Tips   |  Monday, October 20, 2014

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear Brenda" interpreter questions.

This article is specifically for Interpreters in Training.

Interpreter Training Programs are both challenging and rewarding.  It is really up to the student to make the most of the Interpreter Training Program (ITP).  The more passionate and hard working you are, the more rewarding the experience will be.

Think for a moment about your definition of success. What does a successful person do? What does a successful person think? What does a successful person believe? How will you ensure that your time in your Interpreter Training Program is successful? What changes will you need to make?

Here are 5 tips for being successful in an Interpreter Training Program:

1. Set Yourself Up For Success

  • Plan your schedule and follow it.
  • Set goals and exceed them.
  • Control the things you can control.
  • Have a good support system.

2. Work Hard

  • Always act professionally.
  • See challenges to improve.
  • Don’t procrastinate.
  • Stay focused.

3. Build Relationships

  • Socialize!
  • Get involved in your Sign Language Club.
  • Build bridges.

4. Learn and Grow

  • Ask questions.
  • Accept feedback.
  • Face your fears.
  • Do positive self-talk.
  • Learn from your mistakes.

5. Go Above and Beyond

  • Seek as many ah-ha moments as possible.
  • Jump at chances for “hands on” opportunities.
  • Observe as many different interpreters as you can.

Following these tips will help you make the most of your Interpreter Training Program and be well on the way to becoming a successful interpreter.

Are there other tips you would recommend? Share them in the comments below.

 

View/Add Comments (1 comments)

About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Brenda  |  Articles by Brenda

Tips for Rhyming in Sign Language

Site News   |  Tuesday, September 30, 2014

By John Miller

Every year around this time, I get a message or two from teachers and interpreters of deaf children asking how to best convey the concept of rhymes to their students.  Rhyming is a very common curriculum goal in many, if not all early childhood education programs throughout the United States and Canada.

The problem often with rhyming is that many of the words are made-up and, therefore, they have no sign.  We all know that words that have no sign should be fingerspelled if you follow proper ASL rules.  You can fingerspell these nonsense words, but that isn’t always very interesting for the young deaf child to watch and doesn’t accurately convey the concept of rhyming words.

I stumbled upon this great video of Austin W. Andrews, an ASL storyteller also known as Awti, describing how to rhyme in sign language. He uses the classic nursery rhyme “Hey Diddle Diddle” as an example and does an excellent job of explaining how to handle rhyming when signing.

Some of Awti's great rhyming pointers include:

  • Rhyming in English focuses on words that sound the same.  ASL doesn’t use sound, so to use the principle of rhyming in ASL, signs should look the same. 
  • Rhyming is also based on repetition - repeating similar sounds in English to create an audible rhythm.  Do the same thing in ASL by repeating similar signs to create a visual rhythm. Use movement, handshape, location, palm orientation, or other components of signs to create repetition and a visual rhythm. 
  • Stay true to the meaning of the rhyme, but don’t get caught up in delivering a direct translation of each word. To sign, “Hey Diddle Diddle,” Awti signs HI (for “Hey”) and then uses swinging arms for DIDDLE that mimic the movement of FIDDLE in the next line of the rhyme. Swimming arms may not be an ASL sign, but “Diddle” has little meaning in English as well and the point of rhyming is to establish a pattern, rhythm, and repetition (whether audible in English or visual in ASL). 

Watch the short video to see Awti’s rhyming example in action. The video has no audio, but is captioned. If you are a fluent signer, you will not have a problem understanding the signing in the video, and that is actually the best way to watch it.  If you aren’t a fluent signer yet (notice I said YET), then I suggest you watch the video a few times, first reading the captions so that you get the gist of the video and then go back and watch it again, focusing on the sign.

To turn the captions on, click the "CC" button at the bottom of the video.

Resources:

 

View/Add Comments (4 comments)

View More Blog Posts:

Black Friday to Cyber Monday Sale