Articles by BRENDA CARTWRIGHT

Interpreter Q & A: If the Deaf client isn’t paying attention, should the interpreter keep signing?

Interpreter Q & A: If the Deaf client isn’t paying attention, should the interpreter keep signing?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Thursday, November 21, 2019

This Interpreter Q & A ask: If the Deaf client isn’t paying attention, should the interpreter keep signing as normal? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives.
Interpreter 4-1-1: Your Reputation

Interpreter 4-1-1: Your Reputation

By Lindsey Williams and Brenda Cartwright  |  Wednesday, October 9, 2019

As a professional interpreter, it is wise to consider your reputation in the community in which you work. Your reputation is formed on a number of important factors. Are you prepared? Are you dressed appropriately? Are you ready to represent the client and profession to the best of your ability? Are you engaged and give back to the community?
Living Loud: Andrew Foster – Pioneer Missionary, Educator, Mentor, and Advocate for the Deaf

Living Loud: Andrew Foster – Pioneer Missionary, Educator, Mentor, and Advocate for the Deaf

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Thursday, August 22, 2019

Andrew Foster was the first African-American to earn a Bachelor of Arts from Gallaudet University. He ultimately set up 32 schools for the deaf in Africa. Because of this, he is known as the “Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet” of Africa and the “Father of Deaf Education in Africa.”
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 11

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 11

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Thursday, August 1, 2019

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) SEVERAL vs. FEW, (2) USE vs. GET USED TO, (3) LONG AGO vs. USED TO, (4) INTRODUCE vs. INVITE, and (5) PROBLEM vs. DIFFICULT.
Living Loud: Allen Snare – Deaf Pastor, Evangelist, and Missionary

Living Loud: Allen Snare – Deaf Pastor, Evangelist, and Missionary

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Sunday, April 14, 2019

Allen Snare was a Deaf Pastor, Evangelist, and Missionary. Read the article to learn more about the life and accomplishments of this amazing Deaf man.
Interpreter 4-1-1: Your Interpreter Committee

Interpreter 4-1-1: Your Interpreter Committee

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Sunday, March 17, 2019

All of us have heard “little voices” in our head. There may be a voice when you do something you shouldn’t, when you receive praise or when you’re trying to stay motivated. It could be the voice of a parent, a coach, a teacher, a friend, or anyone. This chorus of voices is sometimes referred to as “The Committee” by interpreters.  It represents our minds talking to us while we’re working, playing and living life. Think about what you hear when you’re interpreting. Is your Committee nice? Are they supportive? Do any Committee members have a louder voice than the rest? Here are examples of possible Committee members...
Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 10

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 10

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Monday, March 4, 2019

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings. The signs discussed in this article include (1) CAFETERIA vs. TWIN vs. RESTAURANT, (2) SOCKS vs. STARS, (3) SEE vs. WATCH, and (4) ENOUGH vs. FULL.
Interpreter Q & A: Using Your Phone During a Break

Interpreter Q & A: Using Your Phone During a Break

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Tuesday, February 26, 2019

This Interpreter Q & A asks: During a lull in a staff meeting where I was interpreting, I used my phone to enter some appointments into my calendar (and check my grocery list). Afterwards, my team interpreter told me that she thought doing that was rude and unprofessional. Do you agree? This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives.
Interpreter Q & A: What are our boundaries as interpreters to say something to a Deaf client about their right to request a qualified interpreter?

Interpreter Q & A: What are our boundaries as interpreters to say something to a Deaf client about their right to request a qualified interpreter?

By Brenda Cartwright  |  Wednesday, February 20, 2019

This Interpreter Q & A asks: During a doctor’s appointment I interpreted, the doctor referred the Deaf patient to physical therapy. When we were leaving the office, the Deaf client asked me about my availability to interpret her upcoming physical therapy appointments. I told the Deaf woman my schedule and she said, “Oh well, that’s fine, if you can’t come, my daughter will come and interpret.” Her daughter is a young girl who can sign, but she is not an interpreter. The daughter has no training or certification. What are our boundaries as interpreters to say something to a Deaf client about their right to request a qualified interpreter? I don’t want to look like I’m just trying to make money. My concern is also that her doctors will begin to think that they don’t need to hire interpreters for her because she can just bring her daughter for free. This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Fall 2018 (Issue 35 Volume 4) Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID.