An ASL Dictionary

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Blog Articles by: Brenda Cartwright

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 4

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 4

Learning Tips   |  Tuesday, January 17, 2017

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings.

Hello! Brenda Cartwright (BC) here. Let's continue on the fun topic of: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

The ASL signs shown below look similar, but are not the same. There are many ASL signs that when produced look similar, but in fact have a completely different meaning. Below you will find examples of such signs. Watch closely to see if you can see the difference. In addition, watch my eyebrows, look to see when I tilt my head or lean my body in a certain way, even what my mouth is doing. These nuances are called inflections and trust me, inflections matter. Enjoy!

1. Open vs. Close

OPEN and CLOSE is another pair of signs that look similar but are easy to remember. The hands mimic opening or closing something. These signs are used when talking about items that would open or close in this fashion, like a box. If you are talking about opening or closing a book or window or door, the signs used would be different to more closely gesture the movements made when opening or closing those things.

Open
Close

2. Love vs. Hug

Don’t blink or you might miss the subtle difference between LOVE and HUG! Luckily the context in which the signs are used can often help as well. To sign LOVE both arms are crossed and drawn to the chest like something is being held close to the heart because it is loved. HUG is similar to signing LOVE and is like the motion of giving a hug, but has two movements.

Love
Hug

3. Ice skate vs. Roller skate

The same motion is used when signing ICE SKATE and ROLLER SKATE, but X-hands are used when signing ICE SKATE and bent V-hands are used when signing ROLLER SKATE. To remember this slight difference in handshape, think about your hands representing the moving skates and X-hands with one finger out on each hand are like the single blade of an ice skate, while bent V-hands with two bent fingers out on each hand are like the two front wheels of roller skates.

Ice skate
Roller skate

4. Black vs. Summer

BLACK and SUMMER both have the dominant index finger come across the forehead, but there are some subtle differences that are easy to spot when you know to look for them. The handshape of SUMMER transforms from the index finger to an X-hand, while the index finder is used the whole time when signing SUMMER. Additionally, the palm orientation is slightly different between these two signs. The palm is facing slightly out from the body when signing SUMMER, while it is facing more in towards the body when signing BLACK - the distinction of palm orientation between these two signs is most obvious at the end of the signs.

Black
Summer

5. Can vs. Possible

When signing CAN and POSSIBLE both A-hands move downward at the same time. There are two movements when signing POSSIBLE and one movement when signing CAN (because you are sure - you CAN! Also the stronger the single movement is, the more you are indicating you are confident that you CAN).

Can
Possible

These examples are aligned with the Visual Discrimination section of Lesson 5 (page 60) from Lessons and Activities in American Sign Language by Brenda E. Cartwright and Suellen J. Bahleda. Check out the book for more ASL Activities and watch for more examples from this series: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Brenda  |  Articles by Brenda

The Importance of Interpreters Knowing Their Own Comfort Zone

The Importance of Interpreters Knowing Their Own Comfort Zone

Interpreter Tips   |  Sunday, January 1, 2017

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

Every human being has biases and the ability to predict events is one of the most valuable you can cultivate as an interpreter. As interpreters we have unique access to the lives of our clients. We need to know ourselves and our hidden biases.  What content or situations would you not feel comfortable interpreting?  What interpreting situations are deal breakers? What steps could you take when you find yourself in these situations?

For example:

  • A hearing person yelling at a deaf person.
  • A doctor telling a deaf patient that they are terminal.
  • An offensive joke.
  • A religious or political meeting that goes against your beliefs.
  • A history class where the teacher is intolerant to other cultures and races.
  • A hearing person talking down to a deaf person and treating them like a lesser person.
  • A child abuse case where the abuser acts flippant and casual.
  • A client who always brings conversations around to something sexual.

Every person’s comfort level is different. Think about what types of situations would make you uncomfortable and unable to interpret to the best of your ability.  Once you have a good understanding of your own comfort zone and limitations, you can do a better job of selecting (and avoiding) the best interpreting jobs to fit both your skill and your personal preference. 

What are your interpreting deal breakers and what do you do when one comes up? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Brenda  |  Articles by Brenda

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 3

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 3

Learning Tips   |  Wednesday, November 16, 2016

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings.

Hello! Brenda Cartwright (BC) here. Let's continue on the fun topic of: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

The ASL signs shown below look similar, but are not the same. There are many ASL signs that when produced look similar, but in fact have a completely different meaning. Below you will find examples of such signs. Watch closely to see if you can see the difference. In addition, watch my eyebrows, look to see when I tilt my head or lean my body in a certain way, even what my mouth is doing. These nuances are called inflections and trust me, inflections matter. Enjoy!

1. Nut vs. Not

NUT and NOT both have the thumb of the dominant 10-hand come out from the face. NUT comes from the mouth, like you are eating a nut or just cracked the shell of a nut with your teeth and then spit it out. NOT comes out from the chin and moves farther away from the body in refusal. The biggest difference (besides the context of what is being said) is the facial expression and shaking of the head when signing NOT.

Nut
Not

2. Paper vs. School

PAPER and SCHOOL bring both open hands together. When signing PAPER, only the heels of both palms brush against each other in a repeated motion - think of the pressing or smashing of pulp to make paper. Clap your hands together (without making any sound) in a repeated motion to sign SCHOOL. You can remember the sign for SCHOOL by thinking of a teacher clapping her hands together to get the students’ attention.

Paper
School

3. Name vs. Weigh

NAME and WEIGH both use H-hands. When signing NAME the two H-hands tap together twice to form an X representing a place where a name/signature would be placed on a piece of paper. When signing WEIGH both H-hands start together and the top, dominant hand tips downward representing scales tipping when weighing something.

Name
Weigh

4. Teach vs. None

Flattened O-hands moving out from the body are used when signing TEACH and NONE. For TEACH, the hands come out from the head, representing the person is taking knowledge from their head and passing it on to others. When signing NONE the hands move out from the chest and away from each other in a quick fluid motion indicating that there is zero (the use of the O-hands) or nothing there.

Teach
None

5. Roof vs. House

ROOF and HOUSE look similar but are easy to remember because both closed 5-hands form the outline of a ROOF or a HOUSE.

Roof
House

These examples are aligned with the Visual Discrimination section of Lesson 5 (page 60) from Lessons and Activities in American Sign Language by Brenda E. Cartwright and Suellen J. Bahleda. Check out the book for more ASL Activities and watch for more examples from this series: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Brenda  |  Articles by Brenda

Interpreter Q & A: Wearing a Brace While Interpreting

Interpreter Q & A: Wearing a Brace While Interpreting

Interpreter Tips   |  Thursday, October 13, 2016

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

Dear BC,

I am currently wearing a brace on my wrist for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Today during a break the Deaf client came up to me and asked me to remove my brace because she found it distracting and it affected my clarity. She also said it made her feel guilty for having to make me work. What do you think I should have done?

Sincerely,
Painfully Compromised

An Experienced Interpreter's Perspective:

Our primary function as interpreters is to facilitate communication. If your client feels that your brace was truly affecting her access to equal communication, then you have several choices:

  • You could have removed the brace.
  • You could have not removed the brace and offered to reschedule for another day with another interpreter.
  • You could have offered to call the referral agency to try to find a replacement for yourself for the remainder of the assignment.
  • Or you could both make the best of the situation.

You are the only person who knows your limits, and she is the only person who knows if she is satisfied. We as interpreters have to make sure that we are doing what is best not only for our clients (and our profession), but also for ourselves. It may mean admitting to yourself that you’re not at 100 percent right now and taking some time off until you recover.

Experienced Deaf Consumer's Perspective:

Over the past 25 years, I have had several interpreters who wore braces due to Carpal Tunnel or other injuries in their arms or shoulders. My response was that I judged these interpreters on the accuracy of the information. If that was there, then I would have no problem with it. However, if the interpreter’s expressions or movements indicated that he/she was in pain or having difficulty keeping up, I would also have said something. I would ask for a replacement until he/she is able to do the job fully again. I am acutely aware that interpreters are human beings and are not easily replaced. I try to show understanding and compassion by trying to work with the interpreter. In the long run, this effort pays off because a good and healthy interpreter is worth it.

What's your perspective? Share your thoughts in the comments below.
 

View/Add Comments (0 comments)

About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Brenda  |  Articles by Brenda

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 2

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 2

Learning Tips   |  Tuesday, September 13, 2016

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings.

Hello! Brenda Cartwright (BC) here. Let's continue on the fun topic of: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

The ASL signs shown below look similar, but are not the same. There are many ASL signs that when produced look similar, but in fact have a completely different meaning. Below you will find examples of such signs. Watch closely to see if you can see the difference. In addition, watch my eyebrows, look to see when I tilt my head or lean my body in a certain way, even what my mouth is doing. These nuances are called inflections and trust me, inflections matter. Enjoy!

1. Please vs. Enjoy

Both PLEASE and ENJOY have the dominate open flat hand make a circle over the chest, ENJOY also has the non-dominate hand circling over the stomach at the same time. To remember PLEASE, think of when something is pleasing it warms your heart. Think of all the different kinds of food you enjoy to remember ENJOY also circles over the stomach.

Please
Enjoy

2. Hot vs. Yell

HOT and YELL look similar, but HOT moves down from the mouth like you are forcefully pushing something hot away from your mouth and dropping it, while the gesture made when signing YELL indicates something loud is coming out of your mouth and going up into the air for everyone to hear.

Hot
Yell

3. Brown vs. Beer

BROWN and BEER both use the B-hand moving downward on the face. You can remember BEER slides down the side of the mouth with a repeated motion by thinking of spilling a little bit as you drink and wiping it with your hand (and wiping again to make sure you got it all).

Brown
Beer

4. Food vs. Eat a lot

FOOD and EAT use the same sign - the dominant modified O-hand (also called AND-hand) make repeated movements to the mouth, symbolizing bringing food to the mouth as you eat it. EAT A LOT uses an exaggerated repeated motion because when you EAT A LOT you eat and eat (and eat!). EAT A LOT can also be signed with two hands.

Food
Eat a lot

5. Read vs. Dance

READ and DANCE both use dominant V-hands and non-dominant open palms. However, they are easy to remember because the gestures represent reading and dancing. When signing READ the V-hand represents eyes moving down the page (the open palm) while reading. When signing DANCE the V-hand represents legs dancing on a dance floor (the open palm).

Read
Dance

These examples are aligned with the Visual Discrimination section of Lesson 5 (page 60) from Lessons and Activities in American Sign Language by Brenda E. Cartwright and Suellen J. Bahleda. Check out the book for more ASL Activities and watch for more examples from this series: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Brenda  |  Articles by Brenda

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