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Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

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Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

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Cooking Up Language with Signs: Frosty the Snowman Oreo Truffles

Learning Tips   |  Tuesday, December 11, 2018

By John Miller

This article is part of our “Cooking Up Language With Signs” series, which features a recipe and accompanying sign language word list to get you started on an interactive cooking activity that is great for spicing up language learning at home or in the classroom.

What’s cookin’?

Today I’m cooking up "Frosty The Snowman" Oreo Truffles. These are some of the easiest no-bake treats I make, and every time I take them anywhere, people go nuts over them! You can make them for any occasion, but you’ll see here how I’ve turned them into snowmen for the perfect holiday treat.

This recipe is great to go along with the Frosty the Snowman book or song. I’ve also created an article and word list for the Frosty the Snowman book.

Frosty the Snowman Oreo Truffles

The recipe is simple. Have the kiddo’s crush up the Oreos, either in bowl or in a doubled up Ziplock plastic bag, until they are nice and crushed. Mix together in a bowl with the cream cheese.

Oreo mixture

Roll into balls and place in the freezer for an hour.

Roll into balls and put in the freezer.

Once nice and frozen, melt your white chocolate (I believe they are calling it crème or cream now). This can be tricky because it goes from good to overcooked really fast, so watch it as you are melting it and only start with 60 seconds, then add like 10-15 seconds at a time. Once melted, just dunk the balls in and set them on a pan with waxed paper or tin foil that you will be placing back in the refrigerator. 

Once the outer cream shell has hardened, decorate to look like Frosty with his eyes, button (or carrot) nose, and his big smile! Top him off with a mini Oreo top hat.  I chose the ones that were covered in chocolate here but again that is totally up to you! (I’ve even made them with a Rolo candy on top of the mini Oreo to really make him look fancy!)

Decorate into snowmen

Don’t worry if your balls don’t come out perfectly round or the faces look a little silly as the kids are decorating… maybe Frosty is melting... it is pretty warm in the kitchen! Melted or not, round or lopsided - they still taste delicious with a cup of hot cocoa!

Recipe

Enjoy making treats that look like Frosty the Snowman. Use the pre-built word list created to go along with the recipe to help you as you make this tasty recipe.

Frosty The Snowman Oreo Truffles

Ingredients:

Tools:

Directions:

  1. Crush up the Oreo cookies either in a bowl or in a doubled up Ziplock plastic bag until they are nice and crushed.
  2. Mix the crushed Oreo cookies together in a bowl with the cream cheese.
  3. Roll mixture into balls and place in the freezer for an hour or until frozen / hard.
  4. Once balls are frozen, melt your white chocolate (also called crème or cream) in the microwave.
  5. Dunk the frozen Oreo balls in the melted white chocolate and set them on a pan with waxed paper or tin foil.
  6. Place the tray of white chocolate covered Oreo balls back in the refrigerator.
  7. Once the outer white chocolate shell has hardened, use gel frosting to decorate them to look like Frosty with his eyes, button (or carrot) nose, and his big smile!
  8. Top him off with a mini Oreo cookies and/or Rolo candy top hat.  


Get the Pre-Built Word List for this Recipe!

I hope through the Frosty the Snowman Oreo Truffles word list you will feel confident to cook up some language fun with your children. You can also bring up signs on the Signing Savvy Member App using the pre-built word list as you go through the recipe.

Word List for Frosty the Snowman Oreo Truffles

View word list of ASL signs for Frosty The Snowman Oreo Truffles

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

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Signing Children’s Books: Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer

Learning Tips   |  Thursday, December 6, 2018

By John Miller

This article is part of our “Signing Children’s Books” series, which highlights children’s books and pairs them with pre-built Signing Savvy word lists to help you get started with learning and signing the vocabulary in the book. Reading and literacy is so important. By sharing these pre-built word lists, we hope to cut down on prep time for families that are just beginning to learn ASL and hope you can find more comfort in sharing literacy with our young deaf children.

Children everywhere love the story of how Rudolph and his glowing red nose guided Santa’s sleigh through the night skies on a blustery Christmas Eve long ago. This classic has since been made into several books and movies.

See Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer signed:

Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Choosing Signs

As with any name, the first time you will need to fingerspell R-U-D-O-L-P-H and then either set him up in space OR create an assigned sign name with the children so that you can use that for the rest of the story. I have used a R handshape on the nose, or the sign for deer with R handshapes. Normally we have a discussion about it together, and the children decide what they think Rudolph's assigned sign name should be.

Extension Activities

There are many nice signing activities you can do with this book and song. For a great recipe that goes with the theme of this book, see my article Cooking Up Language with Signs: Peanut Butter Reindeer / Rudolph Cookies.

Get the Pre-Built Word List for this Book!

Use the Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer pre-built word list to help you as you experience this magical story. Have fun with it!

Word List for Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

View word list of ASL signs for the book Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

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Cooking Up Language with Signs: Peanut Butter Reindeer / Rudolph Cookies

Learning Tips   |  Wednesday, December 5, 2018

By John Miller

This article is part of our “Cooking Up Language With Signs” series, which features a recipe and accompanying sign language word list to get you started on an interactive cooking activity that is great for spicing up language learning at home or in the classroom.

What’s cookin’?

Today I’m cooking up peanut butter reindeer / Rudolph cookies. They are a cute and fun treat that kids love. Here is a pre-built word list created to go along with the recipe.

These cookies are great to go along with the Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer book or song. I’ve also created an article and word list for the Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer book.

Reindeer cookies

I like to use a peanut butter cookie base for these cookies just because it gives you that nice brown color for your cookie, but I know some people have peanut butter allergies and some schools won’t allow you to have it in school. That doesn’t mean you can’t make these. If allergies are an issue, use a sugar cookie or something else and just frost the cookies with a brown frosting. If you are using peanut butter cookies, I know Sam’s Club has a great way to save time by using their big boxed sets that come with a couple bags of all the dry ingredients already mixed together for you, AND because they also have the Hershey kisses in them that you aren’t using for this recipe, it’s a bonus chocolate treat for you and the kids!

Shape your dough on the pan in more of a triangle shape, rather than a circle. This will give you a nice face of a reindeer.

Make dough into a triangle shape to form the face of the reindeer.

Bake the cookies as directed and then as soon as they are out of the oven, add the eyes (easily found at Walmart or other baking/craft store), a nice red nose for Rudolph (peanut butter M&M’s seem to be a good size) and antlers that are pretzels already dipped in white crème/cream, chocolate, or yogurt. (You can buy them this way or dip your own, or leave them just as pretzels if you want.)

Add candy to decorate cookies

These turn out so cute, it is hard to eat them. But not that hard. They are tasty!

And my little helpers thought of ways to make the whole reindeer team by changing out the nose color using different colored M&M’s.  Let them have their fun!

Recipe

Enjoy making cookies of Rudolph and Santa's whole team of reindeer. Use the pre-built word list created to go along with the recipe to help you as you make this tasty recipe.

Peanut Butter Reindeer / Rudolph Cookies

Ingredients:


Tools: 

  • cookie sheet / pan
  • spatula
  • (may need a bowl and spoon for mixing if using a box mix)


Directions:

  1. Shape your peanut butter cookie dough on the pan in more of a triangle shape, rather than a circle. This will give you a nice face of a reindeer.
  2. Bake the cookies as directed.
  3. As soon as they are out of the oven, decorate your reindeer cookies. Add the candy eyes, M&M candy noses (use red for Rudolph!), and pretzels for antlers.


Get the Pre-Built Word List for this Recipe!

I hope through the Peanut Butter Reindeer Cookies word list you will feel confident to cook up some language fun with your children. You can also bring up signs on the Signing Savvy Member App using the pre-built word list as you go through the recipe.

Word List for Peanut Butter Reindeer Cookies

View word list of ASL signs for Peanut Butter Reindeer Cookies

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

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Signing Children’s Books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Christmas 123

Learning Tips   |  Friday, November 30, 2018

By John Miller

This article is part of our “Signing Children’s Books” series, which highlights children’s books and pairs them with pre-built Signing Savvy word lists to help you get started with learning and signing the vocabulary in the book. Reading and literacy is so important. By sharing these pre-built word lists, we hope to cut down on prep time for families that are just beginning to learn ASL and hope you can find more comfort in sharing literacy with our young deaf children.

Here is The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Christmas 123 pre-built word list created to go along with the classic book.

The The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a classic book, loved by many. It was a favorite that I would read in my classroom. Not only is it cute and kids love it, but it also incorporates days of the week, counting, and food… if you’ve read some of my other articles, you know I love teaching signing through food! (See some of the other food-related articles I’ve written listed in the Related Articles section below.)

Given the time of year, I am feeling in the holiday spirit, so I picked a book that is a twist on The Very Hungry Caterpillar, called The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Christmas 123.  This book is great for young children and it follows the same patterns of the classic original. It incorporates numbers with colorful Christmas vocabulary.

Get the Pre-Built Word List for this Book!

Use the The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Christmas 123 pre-built word list to help you with the signs as you experience this book. Have Fun with it!

Word List for The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Christmas 123

View word list of ASL signs for the book The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Christmas 123

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

View/Add Comments (0 comments)

Signing Children’s Books: Help! I want to share the love of reading with my little one, but how???

Signing Children’s Books: Help! I want to share the love of reading with my little one, but how???

Learning Tips   |  Friday, November 30, 2018

By John Miller

Recently, I was contacted by a young hearing mother of a 10-month old, deaf child. This mother had two other children that are hearing, she works full time outside of the home, and now her third child was born profoundly deaf. She has tried her best to read and learn everything she can about deafness and educational options. She and her husband have decided they will be using sign language with their family. She was taking formal classes and then acting as the "teacher" for the rest of her family. She felt that so far, the family had been doing a pretty good job trying to learn ASL. She spoke of how sweet it was to see the older siblings doing their best to try and communicate with their new baby brother, who will be using sign language as his primary source of communication.

This mother did share one thing she was feeling very guilty about though; something she knew she did with her hearing children, that she was NOT doing for her deaf child… reading and sharing literacy with him on a nightly basis. Being an educated woman, she knows the importance of reading to young children, but struggled with her own sign language skills keeping up with the vocabulary presented in the children’s books. She also noted how many "no-nonsense words" show up in children's books and wanted advice on how to handle those kinds of words.  

The family had all the classic books and her older children had their favorites that they would ask to be read (and signed) with their baby brother, but how in the world would she begin to tackle words like CHICKA, CHICKA, BOOM BOOM and many of the other words that show up in children's books?

These were many of the same issues I remember dealing with as a teacher of young deaf children much of my career. In my own classroom, I would carefully choose the books I shared with my students, but what about when my students brought books from the library or home? Or when I was acting as the interpreter in another classroom that was having a Dr. Seuss marathon of zummers, nizzards, fifer-feffer-feff, yekko, jogg-oons, zatz-it, etc…

So upon reflection of how to help this mother, I decided that I want to highlight a feature we currently have on Signing Savvy, WORD LISTS!!! Word Lists are a feature where members can create a list of signs they use, in this case, for books they read (whether in their classrooms or in their homes) and SHARE them with other members so that we can learn from each other and cut down on the prep time needed.

To this end, I am beginning a series of blog articles titled "Signing Children’s Books."  Each week I will highlight a children's book to share with your little ones and the signs that go along with them. Hopefully this will help parents, teachers, and families, so that we can find more comfort in sharing literacy with our young deaf children.

If you aren’t already following Signing Savvy on Facebook, please do! That is a great place to get reminders when new articles are posted and carry on conversations about each article.

 

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