An ASL Dictionary

Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

And Much More!

Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

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Signing Savvy Anniversary - A Lot Can Happen in 10 Years!

Signing Savvy Anniversary - A Lot Can Happen in 10 Years!

Site News   |  Tuesday, January 29, 2019

By Jillian Winn

This month is the 10th anniversary of the public launch of Signing Savvy. In those 10 years, nearly 22 million people have used Signing Savvy.

When we set out over ten years ago to create Signing Savvy, we had a vision to create an online sign language resource for educators, parents, interpreters, students, or anyone interested in American Sign Language.

Many people are shocked when they learn that 95% of all deaf and hard of hearing children are born to hearing parents. This means a few things – almost all hard of hearing children are born into families that do not know or use sign language and their parents do not have previous experience with raising and educating a deaf child — many may not have even met a deaf person before. 

The number one concern for parents is "how do I communicate with my child?" followed by concerns with how will their child communicate with others, and what is the best way to raise and educate a deaf child. The options and information may be overwhelming for parents, but just like raising any child, each child and family is different and there isn’t a “one size fits all” plan to execute. Research shows the key is early exposure and full access to a natural language. For many families, ASL becomes an important part of their journey.

Like any language, the best way to learn is to immerse yourself with other native speakers or take a class. However, overwhelmed by the unexpected challenge of having a deaf child and, like all of us, busy with life (working, going to school, raising other children, etc.), we felt parents needed a resource they could access quickly and easily - for those rare spare minutes when they have a chance to sit down and learn signs, to being able to look up a sign when they or their child is wondering, "How do I sign…" when they are on-the-go.

Since its inception, Signing Savvy has always worked closely with schools, parents, teachers and interpreters in order to provide a quality online sign language resource. Not only did we want to be a resource for parents at home, but we wanted to bridge the gap between home and school, and make it easier for teachers to share with parents what is being taught and what signs are being used at school. We wanted to be that home / school connection piece that had been missing in Deaf Education for years. Signing Savvy and its set of features was the solution we came up with. We created word lists to be a powerful tool to allow teachers to share vocabulary with parents and other stakeholders.

Signing Savvy Features

Recently a teacher of the Deaf in Pennsylvania shared how she was using Signing Savvy with us. She said, "I really use this everyday! Love it!" and went on to explain she creates weekly vocabulary lists (Signing Savvy word lists) for her early elementary student. She introduces the next week’s words to him on Friday using Signing Savvy.  She has the student use the Signing Savvy quizzing tool to quiz himself on the iPad by hitting the next button to see if he is right.

She shares the word lists with his classroom teacher as well, who then teaches the vocabulary words to her regular education students along with the deaf student. The classroom teacher and other support staff are able to look up the words on their Apps independently. The ability to create the lists allows teachers to go in and practice on their own or move ahead to be prepared. She said, "It is a great tool and I would have to say my lessons would be much more difficult if I didn't have access to this great App!"

She also prints sign images for the words and use that to hang a sample of the signs for the kids to see. The whole class learns several signs per week. She also created a book for the teachers and staff to reference with all of the printed signs.

Additionally, they refer to the App multiple times for unknown signs or discrepancies and it helps to serve as their “go to” to answer questions. Of course, the word lists can also be shared with the student’s parents so they can learn the vocabulary along with the student.

This testimonial is so rewarding to our team at Signing Savvy, because this is just how we had hoped Signing Savvy would be used when we first created it.

Because of the recent acceptance of American Sign Language as a foreign language for hearing students, high schools and colleges have also joined the ranks of institutions that have found Signing Savvy to be a very helpful resource in their student’s educational process.

Working closely with Interpreter Training Programs and Universities in the US that teach sign language has allowed Signing Savvy to even better understand the value of having a mobile tool that can be very individualized, travel with you, and continually educate you and update you with blogs and signs of the day to assist in your sign language journey.

Benefits of Signing Savvy

In the last ten years, people have shared many additional heart-warming stories with us about how they use Signing Savvy. From the veteran who lost his hearing after service and used Signing Savvy to learn ASL… to the person that wanted to be able to ask their deaf co-worker how their weekend was… to the parents with hearing babies that wanted to sign with them before they learned to talk… to the person learning church related signs… to the teacher teaching ASL who shared Signing Savvy’s quizzing tools with her students so they could review vocabulary and be more prepared for class… to the college students who were able to do better in their ASL classes and learn ASL more easily by using Signing Savvy in conjunction with their classes... Today Signing Savvy is used, not only by parents and teachers, but by both deaf and hearing students, lifelong learners, interpreters, people losing their hearing, children with speech delays, Down syndrome, autism, and apraxia, and anyone wanting a quick ASL reference.

It has been a great 10 years of learning, sharing, and community. A lot can happen in 10 years! We have many exciting things planned moving forward. We hope you will continue on this journey with us to make sign language more accessible. To another great 10 years!

 

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Living Loud: Mandy Harvey – Singer, Ambassador, and Author

Living Loud: Mandy Harvey – Singer, Ambassador, and Author

Deaf Culture   |  Sunday, January 27, 2019

By Marta Belsky

This article is by Marta Belsky. Marta is a third generation ASL user. She has been teaching ASL for 30 years and enjoys sharing her native language with new users.

This article is part of our "Living Loud" series, which highlights famous people who are deaf or hard of hearing and their impact in the world.

Mandy Harvey
Mandy Harvey (Photo Credit: Noam Galai, Retreived from Episode 5: Interview with Deaf Singer Mandy Harvey)

Mandy Harvey was born hearing, but her life took an unexpected turn when she became deaf at the age of eighteen. As a child, Harvey was passionate about music and when she began college she decided to follow her dream to pursue Music Education. However, when Harvey lost her hearing she also lost music, a huge part of her identity. In the ten years since Harvey became deaf, she has overcome emotional and spiritual obstacles and found new ways to pursue her dreams. In 2017, Harvey shocked the world with her singing on the television show America’s Got Talent and has since written a book about her experiences in life. She has inspired millions of people with her story and her music.

Growing Up: A Passion for Music

Mandy Harvey was born in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1988 and her family moved to Colorado when she was a young girl. Throughout her childhood and into her teenage years she was passionate about music. She participated in church choir starting at the age of four, and continued in music through high school. In high school, Harvey was in five school choirs, singing with a wide vocal range from tenor to high soprano parts. In an interview with Justin Miller for the Real Talk TV Show, Harvey described herself as a "strong voice in the choir, but not one to ever put [herself] in the spotlight." Although, she wasn’t much of a soloist in high school, her passion led her to pursue Vocal Music Education in college. She specifically wanted to teach jazz because of the emotion she would be able to create in others.2 Harvey attended Colorado State University. During her first semester, she began to realize that she was having trouble hearing.3

In Denial About Deafness

Harvey was born with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome which is a connective tissue disorder that caused her hearing to deteriorate during her first year in college.1 At first, when she noticed a change in her ability to hear, Harvey wrote it off as an ear infection or a perforated ear drum. She didn’t want to believe the severity of the problem. Harvey had her hearing tested and the results showed by that time she had already lost 30 decibels of her hearing. Frequent doctor visits over the course of the next nine months showed a steady decrease in her hearing. By Christmas of that year, Harvey had lost 55-60 decibels, making her legally deaf. She was fitted with hearing aids. Harvey still held on to the hope that her music dreams could remain intact. However, the realization of her deafness hit her hard and fast one day in her Music Theory class.2

The class was set up to take a test in which the students had to listen to the piano notes and record what was being played. Harvey was poised with pencil in hand waiting to begin the test, when she looked around and saw that all the other students were writing on their papers. Harvey sat there, unable to hear the test that was being given and one by one the students stood up and walked out of the classroom, leaving her sitting alone.2

Harvey dropped the Music Education program, changed majors, and took different classes. Harvey described the time as a "whirlwind" because of how fast things were changing and she had not yet felt the true impact of the situation. She said she was "still holding on to hope."2 During that transition time, she was walking on a sidewalk and she was hit by a bike. The biker was coming up behind her and had been calling out to her that he was passing on the left, but when she didn’t hear him she got hit and her hearing aid was crushed. This was when the realization truly hit her that her hearing loss was real and permanent. "I lost myself that day," Harvey said in the interview.2

Finding Hope: Discovering ASL, the Deaf Community, and Rediscovering Music

After her first year of college, Harvey moved back home. She said, "I would say it felt like I fell down a really dark well."2 She couldn’t see any brightness in her future and she didn’t know who she was anymore. "I had fed into all of the voices that were around me, which were saying that if you can’t hear, you can’t do music, and I allowed them to convince me that that was true and so I gave up on music. I didn’t even sing in the shower for a year and a half."4 Her own identity was intertwined with her life of being a musician and so when that was taken away from her, she felt all was lost.

This darkness took over Harvey’s life for quite a while, but gradually she pulled out of it. She began taking American Sign Language classes, and her sister even skipped her senior year of high school so that they could take classes together. Finding a way to communicate was a crucial step for Harvey to reform her life. She then started to get involved with the Deaf community, made friends, and found people with similar stories to her own. This is what gave her the confidence to allow music back into her life.2

Harvey’s father wanted her to play guitar with him, and she agreed to try. They were able to push aside their inability to communicate with one another and just play together. When Harvey’s father suggested they try to learn a new song, she didn’t think she would be able to, but they pulled up the sheet music anyway. By humming into a small guitar tuner, Harvey was able to see if she was hitting the correct pitches. Learning the song was a long process, but when she sang it through, it brought her father to tears. Harvey didn’t believe him when he said it was good so she recorded the song and sent it to a voice coach, someone she knew would be honest. The voice coach responded that she thought the song had been recorded before Harvey lost her hearing. When the voice coach learned the recording was recent, she insisted that Harvey come back and begin taking voice lessons again.2

Mandy Harvey on America's Got Talent show.
Mandy Harvey on America's Got Talent (Photo Credit: NBC, America's Got Talent, Season 12 (2017). Retreived from Mandy Harvey: Deaf Singer Earns Simon's Golden Buzzer With Original Song - America's Got Talent 2017)

Harvey soon found herself with a slot performing in a local jazz club. She developed her own techniques in being a musician. Harvey takes off her shoes so that she can feel the beat vibrating through the floor. At first, before she became comfortable, she stood at the piano using her hands to feel the vibrations, but gradually she stepped away from the piano.2 She used visual tuners to help her know she was in key and would put her hand on her throat to find where the vibration was the strongest for each note. She would do scales and run through patterns again and again. She can also feel the vibrations of her ukulele when holding it against her body. 4

Her singing career began to flourish, leading to multiple albums, and a tour.1 In 2017, Harvey was a competitor in season 12 of the America’s Got Talent television show. She wowed America and the judges and took 4th place in the competition.

Controversy: Promoting Oralism vs. Deaf Can Movement

During the competition, there was some controversy in the Deaf community because Harvey was "promoting a hearing activity," and she still continues to receive some backlash from certain individuals. They accuse her of promoting oralism and she has even received death threats.Harvey says it’s a very small group of loud voices that are critical and most of the deaf people she has met love what she’s doing.4

Harvey explains she understands the criticism is rooted in an effort to protect Deaf culture. "The Deaf community has been so oppressed for such a long time, and it hasn’t been until recently that we’ve even acknowledged that sign language is a language. In fact, I’m pretty sure only 44 states even accept it as a foreign language, which is ridiculous. But, to have a language, to be proud of your culture, it’s survival. And it’s important." So because she talks and she sings, some criticize her for doing hearing activities, and view it as shunning the deaf community and saying they need to also talk or sing. However, that is not Harvey’s point of view at all.4

“ Deaf [people] can do anything that they want to do, they can do any job. They can do any activity, they can sing, they can paint, they can climb mountains, they can have kids, they can be teachers, they can be CEOs of major companies. It doesn’t matter.
     - Mandy Harvey
Singer, Ambassador, & Author

When her hearing loss progressed, she felt loss, like she didn’t belong in either the Deaf or the hearing worlds. She says it was learning American Sign Language that really opened the door for communication for her and being part of the Deaf community, feeling a sense of belonging. Harvey says, "There’s so many different forms of being deaf… being deaf doesn’t mean that you can’t speak, being deaf doesn’t mean that you don’t like music, being deaf doesn’t mean that you have to live in one small bubble."4

She also explains this philosophy is part of the "Deaf Can" movement that has been going on for the last 15 years. The movement advocates, "deaf can do anything that they want to do, they can do any job. They can do any activity, they can sing, they can paint, they can climb mountains, they can have kids, they can be teachers, they can be CEOs of major companies. It doesn’t matter."4

Following her Passion


Mandy Harvey's book: Sensing the Rhythm: Finding my Voice in a World Without Sound

Harvey’s dedication to following her passion has inspired countless people around America and the world. She continues to sing and encourage others. She is an Ambassador for No Barriers USA, where she travels the country to encourage others, heighten awareness, and challenge stereotypes.5

She now has a book called Sensing the Rhythm: Finding my Voice in a World Without Sound which is about life lessons she has learned. “What story do you think God is trying to tell through your life?” Harvey was asked in an interview with Real Talk TV Show. She responded, "I think that it’s pretty simple, that bad things happen and chaos is all around us, but we have to just keep walking down the path, just keep going forward. That you have such a limited amount of time on Earth and it’s messy and it’s broken and you’re surrounded by people who are also messy and broken and we’re supposed to encourage each other, hold each other up."

Books:

Music:

Resources

  1. Rose, B. (2017, November 15). The singer sent death threats from the ‘deaf community’. BBC News. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/news/disability-41850498

  2. [TheRealtalktvshow] (2017, February 17). Mandy Harvey Interview [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUb61GAr8dg

  3. Winners of the VSA International Young Soloists Competition: 2011 Award Recipients. The Kennedy Center. Retrieved from http://education.kennedy-center.org/education/vsa/programs/soloists_past_recipients.cfm?soloist=soloists2011

  4. Ruderman, Jay. (2018, December 3). Episode 5: Interview with Deaf Singer Mandy Harvey [Audio Podcast, with transcript]. All Inclusive with Jay Ruderman (a podcast on inclusion, innovation and social justice). Ruderman Family Foundation. Podcast retrieved from http://rudermanfoundation.org/podcast/episode-5-interview-with-deaf-singer-mandy-harvey/

  5. Harvey, Mandy. Speaking - Mandy Harvey. Mandy Harvey website. Retrieved from https://mandyharveymusic.com/speaking/

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

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About the Author

Marta Belsky Marta Belsky is a third generation ASL user. She has been teaching ASL for 30 years and enjoys sharing her native language with new users. Marta is on the Lansing Community College Interpreter Training Program Advisory Board and has also been a board member for the Michigan Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf and the Michigan Chapter of American Sign Language Teachers Association.

More about Marta  |  Articles by Marta

Signing Children’s Books: The Napping House

Learning Tips   |  Thursday, January 24, 2019

By John Miller

This article is part of our “Signing Children’s Books” series, which highlights children’s books and pairs them with pre-built Signing Savvy word lists to help you get started with learning and signing the vocabulary in the book. Reading and literacy is so important. By sharing these pre-built word lists, we hope to cut down on prep time for families that are just beginning to learn ASL and hope you can find more comfort in sharing literacy with our young deaf children.

The Napping House is well-loved children’s classic "build upon" book. Kids love these kinds of books, where there is repetition and humor accompanied by beautiful, engaging pictures. This husband/wife team have written and illustrated many wonderful children’s books that continue to offer fun and excitement to the genre of Children’s literature.

This book has so many things you can do with it to explore language and keep the conversation going. My students love to act out the book, whether it is physically acting it out with their classmates, or using toys. There is a 3-D storybook version of The Napping House that includes small pieces your children can use to act out the story, but you may also have toys or items around the house that you can use.

I also had an artist friend do some awesome drawings (see below) so the students could work on their sequencing skills after reading the book.

Drawings to go with The Napping House

You can take some simple images of a Granny, boy, dog, cat, mouse, and flea, then have your children put them in order, first through sixth, that the characters entered the bed in the story. Have them use their math skills to add up how many characters are in the bed as the story progresses. Here is a great example of how to do this.

The book also has many ways to cover the concept of sleep (slumbering, snoozing, dozing, dreaming, snoring), so it lends itself to a nice discussion about how there can be different ways to show all these concepts through sign, that may involve acting out or some creative drama.

There is even a short, 5-minute video on Amazon Prime that tells the story of The Napping House.

There are many, MANY things to do that are fun and exciting! You can even find free printables and activities from the authors. If you are looking for more ideas, there are a lot of activities on Pinterest that go with The Napping House.

I hope through The Napping House pre-built word list you will feel confident to share this story with your children.

So come explore this house, a napping house, where everyone is sleeping…

Word List for The Napping House

View word list of ASL signs for the book The Napping House

Related Books: 

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

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Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 9

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 9

Learning Tips   |  Sunday, January 20, 2019

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings.

Hello! Brenda Cartwright (BC) here. Let's continue on the fun topic of: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

The ASL signs shown below look similar, but are not the same. There are many ASL signs that when produced look similar, but in fact have a completely different meaning. Below you will find examples of such signs. Watch closely to see if you can see the difference. In addition, watch my eyebrows, look to see when I tilt my head or lean my body in a certain way, even what my mouth is doing. These nuances are called inflections and trust me, inflections matter. Enjoy!

1. Child vs. Short

The bent B handshape, with the palm facing down, starts at the side of the body and moves down to sign both CHILD and SHORT. You can remember the hand usually starts higher, by the head, when signing SHORT because height is measured by the top of the head.

Child
Short

2. Pig vs. Dirty

PIG and DIRTY both have the dominant hand, with the palm down, placed under the chin.

These signs are similar because they both originate from the old French sign for COCHON (pig).1 It is easy to remember DIRTY is signed similarly to PIG because pigs are known to be dirty.

However, the handshape and movement is different when signing PIG and DIRTY. PIG uses a bent B handshape, while DIRTY uses a 5 handshape. 

To sign PIG, the fingers bend and flap down together twice, while to sign DIRTY the fingers wiggle. To remember the difference between the two signs, think of a PIG oinking as the fingers bend and flap down in a single motion together, two times (oink, oink!). When signing DIRTY, think of having dirt on your fingers and wiggling them to have the dirt fall off. You can also think of a child with a messy chin.

Pig
Dirty

3. Chair vs. Sit

To sign both CHAIR and SIT, the dominant hand is in the U handshape with the palm facing down. When signing CHAIR, the dominant U handshape taps twice on the non-dominant U handshape and when signing SIT it taps once. This is a common pattern you will find in ASL - the noun version of a word will have two movements, while the verb version will have one movement.

Chair
Sit

4. True vs. Tell

When signing TRUE, the dominant index finger, with the palm facing the non-dominant side of your body, starts at the mouth and moves out, away from the body. The straight-forward motion suggests the truth. The direct path of movement represents evenness and moving the sign away from the body represents sincerity. This sign originated from the French sign for VÉRITABLE (true).1

To sign TELL (as in "to tell someone"), the dominant index finger, faces the body, and starts at the chin and moves out, away from the body. The movement represents the act of words coming out of the mouth. This sign originated from the French sign for DIRE (tell, say) and has been documented (and unchanged) in the U.S. since the early twentieth century.1

Remember that TRUE has the index finger point out (the palm is facing the non-dominant side of your body), while the index finger (and palm) faces the body when signing TELL. The starting point and movement used when signing TELL is also a better representation of words coming from the throat and out of the mouth, than TRUE.

True
Tell

5. But vs. Different

The emphasis of the movement is the main difference between BUT (as in "except") and DIFFERENT. For both signs, the index fingers begin crossed in front of the chest and then separate apart from each other. These signs originated from the French sign for CONTRAIRE, DIFFÉRENT (contrary, different).1

The movement when signing BUT is smaller and the hands move farther apart when signing DIFFERENT. Think of BUT as introducing a contrasting opinion, which may be small, and DIFFERENT as pointing out a significant difference, so a larger movement is used.

But
Different

How can I figure out the difference between signs on my own?

If you see two signs that look close, but not the same, but you’re not sure, you can use Signing Savvy features to help you figure out the difference. All of our signs have sign descriptions and memory aids that members can access. Reading the sign description and memory aids for the signs can help you figure out the small differences between them that your eyes don’t catch at first. We also recommend using the pause and slow motion feature to slow down the video, so you can take a closer look. These features are available to Signing Savvy members.

Take a look, it's in a book!

These examples are aligned with the Visual Discrimination section of Lesson 6 (page 72) from Lessons and Activities in American Sign Language by Brenda E. Cartwright and Suellen J. Bahleda. Check out the book for more ASL Activities and watch for more examples from this series: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

Resources

  1. Shaw, E. & Delaporte, Y. (2014). A Historical and Etymological Dictionary of American Sign Language. Washington: Gallaudet University Press.
 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about BC  |  Articles by BC

Signing Children’s Books: Piggies

Learning Tips   |  Friday, January 18, 2019

By John Miller

This article is part of our “Signing Children’s Books” series, which highlights children’s books and pairs them with pre-built Signing Savvy word lists to help you get started with learning and signing the vocabulary in the book. Reading and literacy is so important. By sharing these pre-built word lists, we hope to cut down on prep time for families that are just beginning to learn ASL and hope you can find more comfort in sharing literacy with our young deaf children.

In the book Piggies, Audrey and Don Wood created a beautiful take on classic finger play. The illustrations show cute little pigs dancing and playing on the tips of hands. Hands covered in mittens, bubbles, and even mud! The pictures are so creative, your little ones will want to look at the photos for hours!

The creators of the book have been nice enough to provide you access to illustrations for the kids to color and do activities of their own. Get free printables from the authors. Through Pinterest, you can also find many different fun and exciting Piggies learning activities to do with the children to extend their use of language and creativity.

I hope through the Piggies pre-built word list you will feel confident to share this story with your children.

Word List for Piggies

View word list of ASL signs for the book Piggies

Signing Savvy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking signingsavvy.com to Amazon properties. That means Signing Savvy may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link, your cost will be exactly the same regardless, but Signing Savvy will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us continue to improve Signing Savvy!

 

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