An ASL Dictionary

Signing Savvy is a sign language dictionary containing several thousand high resolution videos of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, fingerspelled words, and other common signs used within the United States and Canada.

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Signing Savvy is an ideal resource to use while you learn sign language. It includes the ability to view large sign videos, build your own word lists and share them with others, create virtual flash cards and quizzes, print signs, build sign phrases, ...and more

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Help! I want to share the love of reading with my little one, but how???

Help! I want to share the love of reading with my little one, but how???

Learning Tips   |  Friday, November 30, 2018

By John Miller

Recently, I was contacted by a young hearing mother of a 10-month old, deaf child. This mother had two other children that are hearing, she works full time outside of the home, and now her third child was born profoundly deaf. She has tried her best to read and learn everything she can about deafness and educational options. She and her husband have decided they will be using sign language with their family. She was taking formal classes and then acting as the "teacher" for the rest of her family. She felt that so far, the family had been doing a pretty good job trying to learn ASL. She spoke of how sweet it was to see the older siblings doing their best to try and communicate with their new baby brother, who will be using sign language as his primary source of communication.

This mother did share one thing she was feeling very guilty about though; something  she knew she did with her hearing children, that she was NOT doing for her deaf child… reading and sharing literacy with him on a nightly basis. Being an educated woman, she knows the importance of reading to young children, but struggled with her own sign language skills keeping up with the vocabulary presented in the children’s books. She also noted how many "no-nonsense words" show up in children's books and wanted advice on how to handle those kinds of words.  

The family had all the classic books and her older children had their favorites that they would ask to be read (and signed) with their baby brother, but how in the world would she begin to tackle words like CHICKA, CHICKA, BOOM BOOM and many of the other words that show up in children's books?

These were many of the same issues I remember dealing with as a teacher of young deaf children much of my career. In my own classroom, I would carefully choose the books I shared with my students, but what about when my students brought books from the library or home? Or when I was acting as the interpreter in another classroom that was having a Dr. Seuss marathon of zummers, nizzards, fifer-feffer-feff, yekko, jogg-oons, zatz-it, etc…

So upon reflection of how to help this mother, I decided that I want to highlight a feature we currently have on Signing Savvy, WORD LISTS!!! Word Lists are a feature where members can create a list of signs they use, in this case, for books they read (whether in their classrooms or in their homes) and SHARE them with other members so that we can learn from each other and cut down on the prep time needed.

To this end, I am beginning a series of blog articles titled "Signing Children’s Books."  Each week I will highlight a children's book to share with your little ones and the signs that go along with them. Hopefully this will help parents, teachers, and families, so that we can find more comfort in sharing literacy with our young deaf children.

If you aren’t already following Signing Savvy on Facebook, please do! That is a great place to get reminders when new articles are posted and carry on conversations about each article.

 

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Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 8

Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same - Set 8

Learning Tips   |  Tuesday, November 27, 2018

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same” series, which highlights signs that look similar, but have different meanings.

Hello! Brenda Cartwright (BC) here. Let's continue on the fun topic of: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

The ASL signs shown below look similar, but are not the same. There are many ASL signs that when produced look similar, but in fact have a completely different meaning. Below you will find examples of such signs. Watch closely to see if you can see the difference. In addition, watch my eyebrows, look to see when I tilt my head or lean my body in a certain way, even what my mouth is doing. These nuances are called inflections and trust me, inflections matter. Enjoy!

1. Bathroom vs. Tuesday

These signs look similar because they both use one hand in the T handshape, however, both the palm orientation and movement is different. BATHROOM has the palm facing away from the body and has a shaking motion from side-to-side, while TUESDAY has the palm facing the body and uses a circular motion.

You can remember the difference in motion by thinking about how other days of the week are signed. TUESDAY follows the same circular movement pattern, with the palm towards the body, as the signs for MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY, and SATURDAY.

Bathroom
Tuesday

2. Wonderful vs. Sunday

It’s no wonder WONDERFUL and SUNDAY are often confused - they both use two hands, in the 5 handshape, with the palm facing forward, and start in the same location with your hands held up on either side of your head.

However, you will notice that the motion made when signing these two signs is different. When signing WONDERFUL, your hands make small forward movements, while your hands when signing SUNDAY move from being by your head and then move down.

To remember the difference between these signs, think of giving someone two high fives to congratulate them on how WONDERFUL or great something is when signing WONDERFUL.

If you know how to sign all of the days of the week, you may have always wondered why SUNDAY is signed differently from all of the other days (the signs for the other days of the week incorporate the first letter of the word, or in the case of THURSDAY, the first two letters). Historians as far back as 1885, described the sign for SUNDAY originating from thinking of SUNDAY as a holy day. Some say the two raised, open hands represented the large, opened doors of a church. Others have described the sign as a gesture of praise to God.1 So to remember the sign for SUNDAY, you can think of how church is often on SUNDAY and the motion made is for giving praise or hallelujah.

Wonderful
Sunday

3. Husband vs. Wife

If you look closely, you will see that HUSBAND is a compound sign, made up of a combination of the signs for MAN and MARRY, and WIFE is a compound sign, made up of the signs for WOMAN and MARRY.

The signs end the same (like how MARRY ends), but start differently, with HUSBAND starting by the forehead (like MAN) and WIFE starting near the chin (like WOMAN).

You can remember which sign is which, if you understand the pattern these signs follow. There are several signs that follow a pattern based on gender. This gender-based pattern in signs was started back when women regularly wore bonnets and men wore tall hats (remember these signs have been around a long time!). The female signs are signed near the chin because it used to symbolize the place where girls would tie the drawstrings for their bonnets. The male signs are signed near the forehead because it used to symbolize where men wore hats and where the brim of their tall hat was.1 HUSBAND (like MAN) and WIFE (like WOMAN) follow this gender pattern, so HUSBAND starts by the forehead and WIFE starts by the chin. Some other signs that also follow this pattern are GIRL / BOY, DAUGHTER / SON, MOM / DAD, GRANDMA / GRANDPA, AUNT / UNCLE, NIECE / NEPHEW, and FEMALE COUSIN / MALE COUSIN.

Husband
Wife

4. Marriage vs. Hamburger

MARRIAGE and HAMBURGER both use two flat C handshapes in similar locations and with similar palm orientations, however, the movement is different.

Looking at the start of the signs will signal, right away, which sign is being used. MARRIAGE starts with the hands apart, while HAMBURGER starts with the hands together (although, you could argue that HAMBURGER also starts apart before the hands can come together, which only adds to the confusion about these two signs, but the dominant hand starts higher up when signing MARRIAGE).

You can remember the difference between these signs by thinking of forming a HAMBURGER patty with your hands when signing HAMBURGER. The hands start apart and then join together to symbolize coming together in MARRIAGE.

Marriage
Hamburger

5. Mother vs. Vomit

Poor MOM, let’s not confuse her sign with VOMIT! Although these signs start in the same location, the look on the signer’s face alone, should give you a good clue to which sign they are signing… unless, of course, they are really disgusted with their MOM!

You can remember the difference between these signs because VOMIT has the dominant hand come away from the body much farther, to represent VOMIT coming out from the mouth, while the movement while signing MOM stays much closer to the chin. (Remember why MOM is signed by the chin? If not, read #3 about HUSBAND and WIFE again!)

Mother
Vomit

How can I figure out the difference between signs on my own?

If you see two signs that look close, but not the same, but you’re not sure, you can use Signing Savvy features to help you figure out the difference. All of our signs have sign descriptions and memory aids that members can access. Reading the sign description and memory aids for the signs can help you figure out the small differences between them that your eyes don’t catch at first. We also recommend using the pause and slow motion feature to slow down the video, so you can take a closer look. These features are available to Signing Savvy members.

Take a look, it's in a book!

These examples are aligned with the Visual Discrimination section of Lesson 6 (page 72) from Lessons and Activities in American Sign Language by Brenda E. Cartwright and Suellen J. Bahleda. Check out the book for more ASL Activities and watch for more examples from this series: “Signs That Are Close... But Not the Same.”

 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about BC  |  Articles by BC

Interpreter Q & A: Is it ok to eat at a work event once my assignment ends?

Interpreter Tips   |  Friday, November 16, 2018

By Brenda Cartwright

This article is by Brenda Cartwright. Brenda is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, and well known presenter. Brenda is the "Dear Abby" for the interpreting world - author of the Dear Reality column in the VIEWS publication from Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and the book Encounters With Reality: 1001 Interpreter Scenarios. She will be contributing blog articles for Signing Savvy on interpreting, Deaf culture, and answering a series of "Dear BC" interpreter questions.

This article is part of our "Dear BC, Interpreter Q & A” series, which answers questions on interpreting and Deaf culture from multiple perspectives. This article was also published in the Summer 2018 (Issue 35 Volume 3) Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID. VIEWS is a digital publication distributed quarterly by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and dedicated to the interpreting profession. The magazine includes RID member spotlights, announcements from the RID board, and engaging stories about issues impacting the interpreting community. See this article (on page 26) and more in the Summer 2018 Edition of VIEWS Magazine from RID.

Dear BC,

I was asked to interpret for an art department showcase. Food was served during the presentations. After it was over there was an announcement that there was tons of food left and for everyone to "eat up!" My client encouraged me to get some food. My interpreting duties were finished, but I still felt strange about it. I wasn’t sure if it was appropriate?

Sincerely,
Hungry Observer

The video features a full interpretation of what is discussed in this article.

An Experienced Interpreter's Perspective:

As long as the assignment is truly over I think the interpreter can partake of the food.

An Experienced Deaf Consumer's Perspective:

I think the interpreter should politely decline offers of food. You are not a member of the organization hosting the event.

What's your perspective? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

 

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About the Author

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about BC  |  Articles by BC

Signing Savvy Member App Updated to Version 2.5

Signing Savvy Member App Updated to Version 2.5

Site News   |  Friday, November 2, 2018

By Jillian Winn

We just updated both the iOS and Android versions of the Signing Savvy Member App to version 2.5. The update primarily increases the app's performance, resolves some bugs, and adds support to the latest iOS and Android operating systems and devices. The update is recommended for all Signing Savvy members using the mobile app running iOS 9 or newer or Android v4.4 (KitKat) or newer.

If you have not used the Signing Savvy Member App, it is a great way to access Signing Savvy on your mobile devices in a highly streamlined fashion. It is a premium feature available only to Signing Savvy full members.

 

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Self-Care is the New Normal

Self-Care is the New Normal

General Interest   |  Monday, October 15, 2018

By Lindsey Williams and Brenda Cartwright

"Self-care" is a popular topic in recent years, and the trend isn’t slowing down. One problem noticed by your authors, however, is that there seem to be competing definitions of this idea and it’s causing a breakdown in the discussion about the importance of self-care. Should self-care be understood as indulgence? Eating a piece of chocolate cake because it’s been a rough day and this will help you to feel better? Or should self-care be thought of as goal-setting? Training for a marathon because you’ve always wanted to try it and enjoy testing your limits?

What is Self Care? Indulgence? Goal-Setting?
What is self-care? Is self-care indulgence or goal-setting?

The contradiction is stark, and creating a life you don’t need to escape from takes hard work, sacrifice, and patience. In reality, maybe self-care is just letting yourself be "normal." Doing things like sitting down and paying your bills, enforcing a morning routine, cooking healthy meals, working out, putting some oil into your bath, turning off your phone, or having a game night with friends.

Being normal/self-care is a process that involves self-reflection. Despairing at the skinny total in your wallet and then going for a $80 pedicure to feel better is a temporary fix, but also worsening the problem. Training ourselves to resist the impatience of seeking an immediate fix is hard. None of life’s big challenges have easy solutions; learning a new skill, finding a compatible partner, career advancement, etc. Nobody asks to take the hard road but it is through those challenges and by building inner strength that we are able to move forward. We make sacrifices to become a better version of ourselves; the certified interpreter, the parent, the business owner. Moving toward those goals smartly, proactively, and relentlessly is how each of us achieves self-care.

Work on your skills and communication for a different tomorrow. Set new standards for yourself and actually believe in them. Skepticism in your own goals is not helping you get what you want. Your thought process is everything. Obsessing over temporary set-backs is exhausting and leaves little energy to actually become better. Taking action allows us to focus on movement and increases energy. Start by physically writing down what you want to accomplish; make lists. Learn what each item takes, and expect that it will require hard work and sacrifice to get there. Set specific, measurable goals. Writing a book doesn’t happen in one day. But you can write 20 pages. Training for a marathon doesn’t happen in a week. But you can increase the distance you’ve run. Have goals for the day, for the week, for the month, and write them down on paper. Put the paper someplace you’ll see it.

Set daily, weekly, and monthly goals
Set goals - daily, weekly, and monthly - and write them down.

Celebrate goals realized, and then get back to it. Self-care doesn’t require an audience, either, so don’t worry whether everyone is following along. Self-care is an investment of today’s time and energy so you can profit tomorrow.

 

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About the Authors

Lindsey WilliamsLindsey Williams is an interpreter, interpreter educator, and Practicum Supervisor for Lansing Community College’s Sign Language Interpreter Program in Lansing, Michigan.

More about Lindsey  |  Articles by Lindsey

Brenda CartwrightBrenda Cartwright is a seasoned interpreter, a master teacher, well known presenter, and author of several best selling sign language and interpreting textbooks from the RID Press. For the last 30 years Brenda has been the Chair of the Sign Language Interpreter Program at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan.

More about BC  |  Articles by BC

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